Aging with poor breathing habits may harm organs and become costly. These easy breathing patterns may instantly reward productive, graceful aging. photo courtesy @tangojuliette

These Easy Breathing Patterns May Instantly Reward Aging


Right now the rose garden bares full, velvet red roses. They’re irresistible to pass by without stepping off the path for my nose to gracefully greet them. Overtly fragrant. This was the one time today I noticed myself taking a deep breath, otherwise my deep belly sigh is a witness to fatigue or that feeling of being overwhelmed.

Attention to breathing in moments to sigh or smell refreshes focus to body stress.

Breathing is recognized in naturopathic remedies, yoga, and meditation. Medical practitioners frequently encourage their patients to breath deep in order to reduce or eliminate pain. Notice one practice is for skill and the other is prevention.

Occupational therapy practitioners are enthusiasts of energy conversation techniques or ECTs. One ECT is breathing. Approximately 9 of 10 people I work with daily reduce their breathing pattern in times of difficulty. Some hold their breath during moments of exertion like push-ups or lifting a heavy box.

Aging excels with poor breathing habits.

Without adequate oxygen to the body one or all of the following may become an issue: oxygen supplements, anti-anxiety medication, circulatory, or skin issues.  Less oxygen then less brain function. Safety risks increase when the mind or memory is compromised.

Observe breathing patterns to reward with productive aging.

Here are three reinforcers for proficient breathing:

  • Find a rhythm to breathing and the task performance. An extreme example of this is a weight-lifter exhaling while lifting. Pick a specific work tasks or house chore to practice inhalations and exhalations with.
  • If there is breath-holding take note when and where this happens. Identify the surroundings in the space then remove excessive stimulants like visuals or noises. The brain is wired to survive. Breath-holding is an unconscious mechanism for sensory survival but it may be easily reversed when antagonists are identified.
  • Check out Dr. Gay Hendricks morning centering routine practiced used for over forty years.