A Swing In the Workplace Will Improves Beyond Employee Moods

A Swing In the Workplace Will Improves Beyond Employee Moods

Designers are slowly emerging with incredibly functional and stylish swings. A swing is a simple way to improve mood in the workplace. Swinging stimulates two body systems: vestibular and sensory. Each contributes to balance and spatial orientation for overall coordination. They also modulate mood states (Winter, Walmer, Laurens, Straumann, Krueger, 2013). When a swing moves in circles, twists or moves outside of the typical back and forth path it becomes a mechanism to excite. This effective alternative may replace caffeine or ignite motivation. Swinging got lost in interpretation as children's form of play.  If you work near a playground then take a recess to get through work. Jump on a swing before stress heightens emotional tension. Mood states when spinning demonstrated a lack in increased heart rate, confirming an absence of negative emotions (Winter, Walmer, Laurens, Straumann, Krueger, 2013). It also ignites the vestibular system's substantial effect on our mental state. Invest in performance by swinging often. Hang one from the beams in the...
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How to Improve Teamwork with Storytelling

How to Improve Teamwork with Storytelling

Storytelling is a Design Sensibility tool. Design-thinking includes openly sharing experiences on paper or with people for added dimension to problem-solving. The stories we tell our self may be novel or familiar to peers. Sharing perceptions of the way a problem appears or was experienced offers a connection that is unique between the story teller and the listener. Engage in teamwork by communicating personalized details. Long-term improvements to mood and health improve (Pennebaker, 1997) when vulnerability forms. Articulated words shape into octaves, fragrances, or whatever sensation the storyteller conveys. Action inherently designs a storyteller's surroundings (Epstein et. al 2014). Overcoming trauma creates stories of heroism. There are numerous words unspoken and stories bound to bones by clinging to fear of sharing. Aging is the framework to un-silencing believable forms words create. Active listeners seek to improve as a Survivor to overcome feeling like a victim (Grossman, 2006). Questions to Ask: Are you a survivor or victim in your work role? What...
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Seven Screen-time Strategies to Reduce Health Conditions

Seven Screen-time Strategies to Reduce Health Conditions

For many working people, staring at a computer for several hours is the norm in the workplace. That means, hours of screen time not including late night television binges, texts to friends, or surfing the net for recipes. Some side effects of all this time spent with our eyes on screens include: eye strain, headaches, or vision changes. If continued long term it may lead to health conditions type-2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and all-cause mortality. Screen time usage strategies: Meet in an environment that supports active listening in place of texting; be certain all screens are at least 20-40 inches away; invest in anti-glare screens; observe routines to identify if a screen is even necessary; use an app, like Moment, to track your phone usage; take eye breaks...walk away from your screen for at least 20 second breaks every...
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Three Tips For Embracing Uncertainty to Improve Performance

Three Tips For Embracing Uncertainty to Improve Performance

Being open to the messiness of uncertainty is often difficult. Performance behaviors are patterns, routines, and habits. With challenges a natural course of reaction is common. An issue may be some behaviors are causing breaks in relationships, purpose, and health. With time and effort behaviors may change to repair and support teamwork, productivity, and competitive advantages. Performance sharpens by accepting ambiguity. Embracing mystery will build relationships, enhance purpose, and improve skills. Sensations following feelings to what may appear as a fuzzy or messy issue are often uncomfortable. Fear or doubt causes periods of rationalizing perceived risk factors. Sociology and psychologist author Malcolm Gladwell, psychologist Daniel Kahneman, and business woman Arianna Huffington revealed how sensations effect rational. Build Relationships "Good teaching is interactive. It engages the child individually. " Gladwell coined the Stickiness Factor towards a tipping point. Here he identifies building relationships to a child's learning process, which also mimics adult learning styles. "It uses all the senses. It responds to the child...once the advice became...
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Loyalty in Life

Loyalty in Life

The word "loyalty" has deep roots. "Loyalty in life" involves perception and emotion. It's similar to allegiance and includes a sense of duty. At times our behavior isn't loyal to our values. Like snapping at someone you love because you are sleep deprived or hungry. This is an example of how loyalty can waver due to poor self-regulation. Sleep is one of the first things to go as a result of job deadlines, travel or family obligations. Anxiety becomes the antagonist to lack of loyalty! GIG Design's WholeBeSM process recognizes the following six core aspects: Physical Occupational Intellectual Spiritual Social Emotional The first step is to recognize your self-regulation issues. Loyalty in life directly affects your health, your relationships, and your success. Design Sensibility is taught with our WholeBeSM Toolkits. Read more about our services. //  ...
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Self-talk Creates Reality

Self-talk Creates Reality

"I will celebrate a Hallmark holiday this weekend. I won't believe it's foolishness and a marketing gimmick for money. I want the day filled with love, however that comes to fruition. That's my self-talk about Valentine's Day. Self talk creates reality. Likely, Valentines Day is a 'water-cooler topic', often one inside the home. If your self talk is easy to persuade then your reality isn't on firm footing. Two years ago I learned about a Stanford professor's theory on the phenomenon of changing our behavior. He used "I will" + "I won't" + "I want" to describe willpower. Our emotional reactions will eventually follow those two words spoken aloud. This becomes the end goal. Do you will, won't, or want a different behavior? Self talk creates reality.   // ...
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Peers In the Workplace That Are Recovering From Trauma

Peers In the Workplace That Are Recovering From Trauma

Peers in the workplace that are recovering from trauma will have difficulty verbalizing their emotions or even a simple thought (VanderKolk, 2014).  There is an uncertainty about life that confuses as they sort through their trauma.  With time and repetition, their communication patterns will slowly form into crisp, clear, confidant responses. Confidence often comes after strategy. Chess is a great example of strategy. Wikipedia enlightens on the historical game of chess, once called curling: a great deal of strategy and teamwork goes into choosing the ideal path and placement of a stone for each situation, and the skills of the curlers determine how close to the desired result the stone will achieve. Workplace culture words optimize strategies. Teamwork helps but listening and comprehension is key.  A safe environment and it's objects enable trust. Interiors or dwelling spaces communicate a context to influence communication, confidence. 99% Invisible provides a concrete example of this. In his podcast on broken glass, Roman Mars concluded: ...architecture is personal.  The strangest part...
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Selflessness as Free Medicine

Selflessness as Free Medicine

When you get stuck in a rut and are so so stressed out how do you feel? At a pivotal point in my life ten years ago my feelings kicked me into action mode. I believed the stride required being alone but chose environments that supported healthy healing to cope through the stress. Loneliness lengthened my healing process. We are relational beings. Once I learned a method to break down self-judgement and shame I slowly invited others into my life. This action taught selflessness. Lets look at how research supports selflessness as free medicine to mind, body, soul. Giving or sharing is an innate feeling (Brown 2003). Like all other behaviors it requires acting on the feeling over time to become a skill, habit, pattern. Sharing space with others improves the immune system, sleep, and circulation (Cohen et. al 2005). Unselfish kindness and warmth towards all people reduces cellular aging and lengthens life (Hoge et. al 2013). Incorporate the fullness of what...
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Distraction Coping Strategy To Avoid Becoming Overwhelmed

Distraction Coping Strategy To Avoid Becoming Overwhelmed

Grounding is a distraction coping strategy that changes inward focus outward. Two of the three ways involve what's in your line of sight or objects you are in direct contact with. It anchors the mind to present realities. This coping strategy works best before or just when emotions begin to feel overwhelming. People who practice this strategy use one of three methods that works best for them: mental, physical, or soothing. Each offers about ten tactics to build outward focus. Rate your emotional pain and current mood to begin any of the three methods. Keep your eyes open to scan your immediate surroundings. Visual aspects of Grounding are more prominent in the mental and physical methods. A soothing plan may be a safe retreat, like a pedicure or a hot shower. Mental grounding may include environmental descriptions that are simply and swift like identifying letters on a board. Physical grounding requires safe places for touch, joint impact,...
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Post Traumatic Growth

Post Traumatic Growth

This last week while hiking in Connecticut, we came across a man that was hiking the entire Appalachian Trail.  He was asking some other hikers about the best type of hiking shoes and talked excitedly about an apple someone had just given him. We all were in awe at such an introspective and dedicated life choice.  Initially I was intrigued by this man’s story, what brought him to this point and well… a thousand more questions regarding logistics alone. The concept of moving and processing certainly goes together. But this man’s choice really isn't so far off from some of our own journeys. Recently, I heard someone say that we all have a turning point in our life.  We define ourselves by that turning point – essentially we view ourselves as being two different entities before and after that event. But it typically takes something to startle us, jolt us, move us. This event can help us evolve or stunt us from growing. When...
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Six Ways to Be Brave With Siblings

Six Ways to Be Brave With Siblings

The sibling bond is instrumental to health. According to the Prevention Research Center: in childhood and adolescence, siblings spend considerable time together, and siblings' characteristics and sibling dynamics substantially influence developmental trajectories and outcomes. A friendly acquaintance is much more tolerable than a sibling acquaintance. There's no history of who made dad angry! So, how do you get to know your siblings? There may be an early relationship history with less contact once in college. I've been utterly appalled to witness the power of family maliciousness at times of trauma or illness. Standing over a loved one being aggressive or violent is poor support during hospitalization. Are you resentful of your sibling? A worthwhile mental health question is: am I holding a grudge? Make a list to confess the anger. I keep an ongoing list then cross off grudges when they are resolved. It's silly some of the memories that surface but imperative to critical healing. Forgive daily. Commit to minute by minute forgiveness. The Journal of Behavioral Medicine sites an emerging study on...
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Create a Trust Environment

Create a Trust Environment

I remember what I was wearing, the room I was in, the furniture, the color...the smells. Past memories surface when least expected. In a fleeting moment confusion may occur. The mind races towards how to direct behavior. A task or person may trigger past trauma, pain, or uneasy sensory memories. Aware or not, everything registers in to the brain as a memory (ASA 2014). So colors, objects, people, patterns - anything in the line of sight (and peripherally), smell, taste - all registers as 'data'. The brain organizes this information to use as a response behavior. Trust is included in the life memory bank. Comfort, safety, restful environments or things are included as trustful. This intellectually driven method aids to establish trust. Conflict resists trust. The brain organizes conflict into 'fight' behaviors like passivity, anger, or manipulation. It's capable of experience-dependent change. It needs present experiences to change its original interpretation. Questions to Ask: Is there a person or people at work...
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Coping Strategies for Stress

Coping Strategies for Stress

Have you been pushed to a point to leave your job? Office politics and peers are two known challenges to personally coping with stress. Personal issues add stress into work environments, too. Those committed to adhere to a stress-filled work role require behavior strategies for compromising. Stress coping strategies might challenge another core lifestyle role. Especially when values and morals are compromised. Children model their elders in life experiences. They learn what their values, morals and beliefs are within their surroundings. Their ideas on handling conflict blooms from their culture.  When people share stories about how conflict or violence shaped their success and failures it offers diverse opportunities in how to cope or strategize for managing stress. Conflict is personal but it reaps great rewards when openly discussed and resolved. Try this: Write down the the steps to conflict resolution listed below. Repeat aloud the rules for fighting fair. These two steps facilitate retention of information for forming healthy habits. 3. Be creative! Sass up something for a...
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How Trauma May Damage Life Without Help

How Trauma May Damage Life Without Help

One part of learning is through sharing stories about life experiences. Working in healthcare is equivalent to reading biographies or short stories. Every day listening included individuals, young and old, sharing their joy and pain through story-telling. A recent story included the life course up to the moment of witnessing a first body tremor.  It was horrific, sad...a consistent visceral response through the end. This individual openly confessed to neglecting signs through their life that eventually led to neurological impact. Trauma occurred but the course that was chosen was one of neglecting the healthier path. To add to the tremors were movement, visual and digestive issues.   The American Psychological Association sites trauma as an emotional response to a terrible event - an accident, rape or natural disaster. Merriam Webster's definition includes physical, psychic or behavioral, and emotional events. The website helpguide.org summarizes: Emotional and psychological trauma is the result of extraordinarily stressful events that shatter your sense of security, making you feel helpless and vulnerable in...
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