Bedtime Strategies for 3 Different Sleep Issues

Bedtime Strategies for 3 Different Sleep Issues

Sleep hygiene a significant contributor to performance behaviors. Achieving optimal hygiene requires effort and perseverance. To illustrate how one might achieve sleep below are three stories about three different characters struggling with sleep: C. Want, C. Fear, and C. Loathe. “I want to sleep more.”  C. Want follows trends. Routines include variations of: caffeine to wake or to keep aroused, sugar for quick surges of energy, social media avenues to distract feelings, and typically saying ‘yes’ to everything. The body works naturally by following a biological clock that organizes by daylight patterns. Want an energetic rhythm. Set up necessary sleep hygiene for daytime napping and body-inspired bedtime cues. “I fear over-sleeping.” C. Fear delays going to bed. Routines include variations of: denying fatigue during evening hours, working more after dinner, laying in bed with the laptop or smartphone, and falls asleep on the...
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Master Stress-management With A Multi-Dimensional Approach

Master Stress-management With A Multi-Dimensional Approach

  When walking stairs the body needs to balance on one foot in order to lift the other in motion upward or downward. Eventually both feet land on one surface. Learning how to master taking a step is multi-dimensional. It requires physical, intellectual, and emotional performance. Mastering managing stress is multi-dimensional. The following story illustrates two different reactions to stress: One adult recalled that her father was a friendly, loud, active man who loved to play with her in a very active way when she was small, picking her up and tossing her in the air. Unfortunately, this woman was severely gravitationally insecure, so every time he did this she was terrified, and she hated having him come near her as she did not know when she would be tossed about. Her father felt rejected by her response and eventually gave up interacting with her, resulting in a significant emotional distance between them. She recalled one particular day, when in exasperation, her father told her,...
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A Swing In the Workplace Will Improves Beyond Employee Moods

A Swing In the Workplace Will Improves Beyond Employee Moods

Designers are slowly emerging with incredibly functional and stylish swings. A swing is a simple way to improve mood in the workplace. Swinging stimulates two body systems: vestibular and sensory. Each contributes to balance and spatial orientation for overall coordination. They also modulate mood states (Winter, Walmer, Laurens, Straumann, Krueger, 2013). When a swing moves in circles, twists or moves outside of the typical back and forth path it becomes a mechanism to excite. This effective alternative may replace caffeine or ignite motivation. Swinging got lost in interpretation as children's form of play.  If you work near a playground then take a recess to get through work. Jump on a swing before stress heightens emotional tension. Mood states when spinning demonstrated a lack in increased heart rate, confirming an absence of negative emotions (Winter, Walmer, Laurens, Straumann, Krueger, 2013). It also ignites the vestibular system's substantial effect on our mental state. Invest in performance by swinging often. Hang one from the beams in the...
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Five Questions to Identify Which Stress Condition Is at Risk

Five Questions to Identify Which Stress Condition Is at Risk

One-fourth of all employees view their job as the number one stress in their lives. ¹  Yale University found that twenty-six percent workers report they are "often or very often burned out or stressed by their work. ² Health care expenditures are nearly fifty percent greater for workers who report high levels of stress. ³ The National Institute of Occupational Science and Health state that job stress is: the harmful physical and emotional responses that occur when the requirements of the job do not match the capabilities, resources or needs of the worker. Identifying the varied signs of job stress are what occupational therapy practitioners are skilled at. Stress is rarely seen as serious by both employees and employers. It's become a societal norm that people simply refer to their day as 'so busy'. Research resolved speculation of body and mind side-effects as early warning signs of job stress, including: cardiovascular disease, musculoskeletal and psychological disorders. Workplace injury, suicide, cancer, ulcers and impaired immune systems are more often...
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Seven Steps That will Reduce Debilitating Stress and Fear

Seven Steps That will Reduce Debilitating Stress and Fear

Last week a group of women revealed the frustration of relational stress. Following our discussion it was revealed the cause of high stress was poor communication. The computer, cell phone, landline, and various wireless signals are convenient replacements to connecting in person. Each severely lowers body movement, including a stroll or brisk walk to meet a peer within a building or even the body mechanics to drive to a meeting. Anxiety disorders are rising in the United States and social media is one mechanism that is pulling the trigger. 40 million American adults fall into debilitating uncertainty or fear (NIMH). Social norms are to seek visual or audible rewards from screens. Coping weighs on the amount of those rewards are received each day. Emotional processing is quickly steering away from inward reflection for outward expression by catloging feelings in ink, graphic, and other creative mediums. Screens and keyboards are slowly replacing nourishing handwritten thoughts, sketched imagery, and hand-crafted tokens of appreciation to mail by parcel....
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Gestalt Principles in Daily Life

Gestalt Principles in Daily Life

Gestalt isn't a regularly used term. Out WholeBeSM method repeatedly engages design sensibility to enable stress management. The following definitions explain why gestalt is so important and meaningful in your everyday life. The universal root + definition of Gestalt GERMAN | gestalt {form, shape} In 1920, German psychologists used this term when describing something that is greater or different than the sum of it's parts. Something that is unexplainable through depiction of it's parts. Unified in physical, psychological or symbolic elements to create a whole Charlotte Bunch once said, "Feminism is an entire world view or gestalt, not just a laundry list of women's issues." Artists and designers trigger "gestalt sightings" of something that isn't finished. However, your mind still connects it.  An example is: conn_ct_d   Your mind fills in the blanks. Our mind identifies a missing link and then completes it. This is something our  senses naturally do. Gestalt principles in daily life include continually filling in those blanks through being aware of...
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Live and Learn

Live and Learn

To say, 'live and learn' is all toooo cliche, yet so true! Here's an example of a recent teachable moment plus five steps to reduce being unaware of what life may be teaching you. It began with how often I use my pool. You see, I moved into a new place just over a year ago.  Initially, I envisioned living near the ocean with a roommate to balance out the cost of additional preferences. I ended up with a better option: my own space with a pool. It took me nine months to use it! Now, this is odd because one way I calm myself is by touch, so my quick go-to may be a soft blanket, a hug or a bath.  Daily I gazed past the function of the pool with eyes only of admiration for its beauty. There was no thought to jump in when stressed. That is, until last week. The day after my blissful dip I couldn't help to question this blind...
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Loyalty in Life

Loyalty in Life

The word "loyalty" has deep roots. "Loyalty in life" involves perception and emotion. It's similar to allegiance and includes a sense of duty. At times our behavior isn't loyal to our values. Like snapping at someone you love because you are sleep deprived or hungry. This is an example of how loyalty can waver due to poor self-regulation. Sleep is one of the first things to go as a result of job deadlines, travel or family obligations. Anxiety becomes the antagonist to lack of loyalty! GIG Design's WholeBeSM process recognizes the following six core aspects: Physical Occupational Intellectual Spiritual Social Emotional The first step is to recognize your self-regulation issues. Loyalty in life directly affects your health, your relationships, and your success. Design Sensibility is taught with our WholeBeSM Toolkits. Read more about our services. //  ...
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If Seeking Greater EQ Then Improve Self-Awareness

If Seeking Greater EQ Then Improve Self-Awareness

Dr. Steven Aung and Dr. Badri Rickhi are positioning mental health and spiritual wellbeing as a mind/body necessity. There are three recommendations they encourage for achieving improved performance: stress reduction programs, adapting the body to nature, and being aware of the senses. Rationale and emotions steer behavior reactions. A "window of tolerance" is what Dr. Bessel van der Kolk identifies as that short moment between being stimulated - feeling and rationalizing - to behaving a certain way. When the body is hyper-aroused then the brain disengages from that short moment of time. Neuroscience identifies self-awareness as the most effective way to build EQ. Silence or music engages self-awareness. Soulfulness engages neurological links that direct the mind into harmonic patterns. We process sounds in the same region of the brain that we process behavior change. Harmony becomes literal for both internal and external stimulus. QUestions to Ask: How do you manage stress? What does 'adapting the body to nature' mean to you? ...
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Overcome Anger, Fear, and Stress One Surprise at a Time

Overcome Anger, Fear, and Stress One Surprise at a Time

Daniel Kahneman, author of Thinking Fast and Slow says, "You are more likely to learn something by finding surprises in your own behavior than by hearing surprising facts about people in general". Anger, fear, stress, or anxiety following a surprise affects every body organ as well as those in the surroundings (Siegal and Bergman, 2006). Surprises may bring out behaviors seeded from the inner 3 year-old.  Some surprises may lead to anger once the results are factored into a time line.  Therefore, it may require motivation to continuously observe performance behaviors. Yet, once in pursuit of the surprise a student to behavior change is born. Questions to Ask: How well do you adapt to surprises? What is a common reaction to a surprise resulting in excessive time to resolve a result? What is one way to change feeling angry due to a surprise? Kahneman recommends the first step to change is learning through observation. Seek the...
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Why Destructive Behaviors May Be Performance Supporting Tactics

Why Destructive Behaviors May Be Performance Supporting Tactics

Celebrating meeting a deadline met or coping with managerial tactics arouses feelings. Sensations become acute in these and numerous other performance moments. What is heard and seen are most discussed but there is also smell, tactile, exertion, instinct, and taste sensations. The exertion of heavy feet walking through an office or facial hair petting are two sensory tactics that calm the nervous system. The comfort of a soft-foam, fabric covered chair to sit in verses a firm, swivel seat may improve one's ability to focus on research work. Alternatively, the motion of rocking and swiveling may distribute sensations for reducing anger while in an emotional overhaul. Salty or sweet tastes often and unknowingly provide hormone or body chemistry support. All these pleasure-seeking sensations are coping strategies for managing feelings that directly effect the nervous system. Each response must not be too quickly classified as destructive or unhealthy if the central nervous system had the ability to speak with words. Sensory patterns may change with...
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Six Key Employee and Workplace Contextual Elements

Six Key Employee and Workplace Contextual Elements

There are workplaces with a culture expectation of work tracked by shift hours or a behavior standard to cover all tattoos. A workplace belief and custom may be whispering through cubicle workstations. These are examples of contextual elements in the workplace. Context is one of three performance factors used to improve performance outcomes. Contextual elements identify opportunities for education, employment and economic support as accepted by the culture in which one is a member. Context is one of three performance factors to divide performance into behavior-specific elements. The elements categorized as contextual include: expectations of culture, personal beliefs and customs, behavioral standards, demographics, stage of life and history, and relationship to time.   Occupation and sense are the additional factors to organizing performance elements. The context factor digs into workplace policy and procedures, as well as the employee's present state of workability, perspective, and values. When employee...
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8 Easy Freebies For Guaranteed Body Support At Work or For Travel

8 Easy Freebies For Guaranteed Body Support At Work or For Travel

Adjusting to work conditions as a telecommuter has its challenges. Good fortune may bring a flat surface wide enough to support a laptop. Typically, its propped across the legs with occasional havoc if they're crossed. The back bumper of a car may become a chair. A work surface may be the cost of a warm beverage. Sometimes the price jacks-up when there's the unfortunate parking ticket. Of course, there is that occasional back corner desk that costs musty smells from trash-worthy office furnishings. A spirited stress-less performance while on the road depends on adaption.  This doesn't mean to desensitize postural or mental supremacy. These costs become epidemic to musculoskeletal disorders to the spine or hips or suppressive anxiety beatings. The occasional is an exception but retirement may span into later years if hospital bills or absences from poor work conditions deplete savings accounts. Here are 8 easy freebies guaranteed to unburden and support the mind and body when working or traveling. No new furnishings or equipment required to do these. Frequent...
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Coping Strategies for Stress

Coping Strategies for Stress

Have you been pushed to a point to leave your job? Office politics and peers are two known challenges to personally coping with stress. Personal issues add stress into work environments, too. Those committed to adhere to a stress-filled work role require behavior strategies for compromising. Stress coping strategies might challenge another core lifestyle role. Especially when values and morals are compromised. Children model their elders in life experiences. They learn what their values, morals and beliefs are within their surroundings. Their ideas on handling conflict blooms from their culture.  When people share stories about how conflict or violence shaped their success and failures it offers diverse opportunities in how to cope or strategize for managing stress. Conflict is personal but it reaps great rewards when openly discussed and resolved. Try this: Write down the the steps to conflict resolution listed below. Repeat aloud the rules for fighting fair. These two steps facilitate retention of information for forming healthy habits. 3. Be creative! Sass up something for a...
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One of These Three Stress Responses Will Empower You To Boost Performance

One of These Three Stress Responses Will Empower You To Boost Performance

While sitting at your desk, working in the kitchen...in every task and environment your senses are bombarded. All information comes to us through sensory input. An average of 2,000 bits of information per second enters our brain (Willis 2009). Although, everyone processes through this information differently. Our senses first sift through all of it before it even reaches our awareness.  Neurologically our body organizes then attempts to adjust its reaction to an impulse. Modulation provides a behavior that safely adapts to the stress of change with less risks on health. Everyone responds to stress differently. Knowing how your senses respond may empower you to boost performance: Some of us are hypersensitive or sensory over-responders, in which we react to sensations faster and stronger than those with normal response levels (Reynolds and Jane 2007).  These aren't willful, but automatic and unconscious physiological responses to sensation. Questions to ask: Is high activity the preferred daily pace? Is there impulsiveness in behaviors? Are there...
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Boost Sleep

Boost Sleep

All this social media talk about sleep. Is it overrated? Sleep is an occupation that directly supports its counterpart occupations including work, self-care, participation, education, and interdependent relationships. The inability to sleep over an average of 7.5 hours every night directly creates a counterforce to focusing, problem-solving, and carrying-out actions in team-work, competitiveness, and productivity. Will-power weakens enabling absences and illness caused from poor hygiene and body care. The less or more sleep the steeper the hill to being productive or to be at your best performance (Hublin et al 2013). To get to a lifestyle of aging gracefully and maintaining daily performance ask these questions: Is proficient self-care present? Is stress being burrowed by unhealthy behaviors (over-eating, laziness, blaming others)? Is it difficult to fall asleep most nights? What patterns most often occur with lack of sleep? What routines remedy next day blahs from lack of sleep? Humans are...
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Our Gut Brain

Our Gut Brain

Who said we feed more than one brain? The butterflies, the stomach and head aches, inflammation, nausea, gastrointestinal issues, allergies, and many other common illnesses. Our head brain is similar to a car battery. It powers the body. Our gut brain is similar to a car transmission. It turns everything entering the body into energy. Here's how this breaks down. Our gut houses a system called the enteric nervous system. It communicates to our head brain feelings that exceed hunger. Our head brain directly communicates to our gut brain the conversion of sensations to feelings. This information exchange regulates hormone secretion. Stress strains our mood-regulating hormone, serotonin, by a whooping 95%! Organs suffer from that much serotonin. Stress is as common as life choices. It's not bad. The culprit is how or if we are preparing for stress then managing it when it happens. Stress management is taking action by voting for a healthy mind, body, and work environment. Initial exploration to these actions begin with asking these...
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Texture May Arouse Emotional Workplace Behaviors

Texture May Arouse Emotional Workplace Behaviors

Texture is full of variance. It has pattern, color, material, and weight. Have you considered using it for shock value? One way to form a memory is by shocking our nervous system. Our response to seeing an appealing texture is to touch it. Something soft but feels like sandpaper will leave a lasting impression. It may sound harsh but in the right context it works! Our brain's plasticity allows us to change unhealthy behaviors.  It first detects, then reacts to sensations. Detection occurs on an unconscious level. Reaction is what fosters a behavior. Texture is just one way to access our millions of neurological functions in pursuit of changing behavior. Texture may intensify emotion within workplace behaviors. Daily, excessive tasks including products like seating, office equipment, even writing tools can cause adversity over time. Texture of fabric weave in clothing, jewelry settings, or skin care products may irritate some. Hugging, holding hands, and primary contact mechanisms at work is a different purview of texture but still...
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