How To Thrive When You Are Hypersensitive to Environments

How To Thrive When You Are Hypersensitive to Environments

Social, WholeBe Toolkit, Workplace
Often simply thinking about being in a certain place at a certain time is exhausting. When this is most often the case then it there may be a hypersensitive tendency. Awareness of sensory needs simplifies solving the connect between design factors and excelling performance. When a person is hypersensitive to an environment the most noticeable response will be avoidance. Interior design factors effecting the hypersensitive, including furnishing placement and object purposes, often may be modified. Also, there are tactics to mentally or physically prepare for these circumstances. Our hypersensitive community can reduce their anxiety and thrive once they understand how to manage their sensitivities. [caption id="attachment_7053" align="alignright" width="300"] Alignment Framework | Paolo Ragonethe[/caption] This feasibility study is specific to children's reaction to a dentist office. It builds the foundational understanding an environment contributes to what…
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Three Talent Management Strategies Developing Multi-generational Workforce

Three Talent Management Strategies Developing Multi-generational Workforce

Workplace
Across generations, creating meaning at work is key to being. We use Being here to capture identity, self-awareness, and tolerance. Talent management practices that engage a multi-generational workforce are informed by an understanding of the influences and values of each generation.  Incorporating trends such as: Baby Boomers crave contributing. Generation Xers seek clear logic for their work tasks. Millennials want to make a tangible difference. Optimal talent management transforms work into being meaningful.  Employees sharpen talent as they value being their whole-being. So, this includes use of their time, talent, and relationships. Also, they feel safe and supported in both relationships and surroundings. Reverse-mentoring, the corporate break place, and role-sharing are three strategies to support a strong multi-generational workforce. Established support network Mentoring is increasingly becoming structured and strategic, as organizations are noting its essential role in…
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Six Case Studies Where Sensations Became Mind Fuel

Six Case Studies Where Sensations Became Mind Fuel

HR Academy, Workplace
Behavior results from being distracted and distressed have been researched since the 1960's. Science's primary focus is on the central nervous system's response to sensations. Results identify that performance behaviors failing to modify sensory intake sufficiently create perceptual instability. Performance abilities reducing or eliminating distractions and distress are demonstrated by employees with a healthy mind and body. According to 2012 Aflac Workforces Report of 6,100 United States workers, those receiving health and wellbeing services report higher level of job satisfaction, feel happier with their employer, and are more satisfied with their overall benefits. 55% of millennials believe a healthy mind leads to a healthy body. Sensations are mind fuel. Stimuli enters the body as information. The processed result is behavior. Hypersensitivity, hyposensitivity or magnasensitivity are 'disturbances of sensory modulation and/or information processing'. An intervention…
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Performance Improves By Sound, Taste, and Visual Responses

Performance Improves By Sound, Taste, and Visual Responses

HR Academy, Intellectual
Science has been slowly revealing how to retrain the brain. Day-to-day there are moments when something isn't so pleasant. Consistent moodiness may trigger with an overly optimistic peer. Frequent disruptions are common with high-traffic noise in the walkway. A foggy brain after lunch disengages attention to detail. Cognitive science is linking biological responses like those listed above with cultural experiences. Performance improves by changing daily experiences. Sound, taste, and visual responses are three biological initiatives for retraining the brain. Here Is What You Hear A new part of the brain was revealed through auditory testing. Scientists confirms the brain has neuroplasticity. This means the brain is capable to change patterns with thinking, feeling, and behaving. According to most recent research frequency-following responses is one way to improve  audible sensitivities and…
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What Resources Act Like If They Were Your Employee

What Resources Act Like If They Were Your Employee

HR Academy, Occupational
The short stories in Rich Dad Poor Dad by Robert Kiyosaki instantly empowers. Kiyosaki continuously reminds readers to "mind your own business" with the metaphor that dollar bills are an employee. They work for performance outcome. This helped me to appreciate that all the personal resources we choose are literally our employees. The form and function of furnishings we use work for us to accomplish sleeping, sitting, and eating. Every object we own provides an outcome including ease of usability, longevity of wear-and-tear, storability, and ownership advantages. Words are our employees. Thoughts expressed are resources providing returns we hope to anticipate. Destructive words have outcomes. Supportive words have outcomes. Expressed words are employees investing in value-creation while thoughts are like employees looking for work. Communities we use become employees accomplishing or hindering goals. Classrooms, work-spaces,…
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Why Alone Time May Improve Performance Outcomes

Why Alone Time May Improve Performance Outcomes

HR Academy, Spiritual
The word "alone" can mean different things. For instance, the single business, self-employed person may work alone. Going through a morning routine, doing a crossword puzzle, or cleaning the house are all activities that may be done during alone time. Often employees would be ecstatic to have alone time in place of work time around numerous or sometimes one person. However, there are other moments when being alone can be uncomfortable or down right scary. Being alone triggers spirit-based behaviors. Performance relies on the spirit of an individual. At GIG Design spiritual behavior is one part of design sensibility. It establishes actionable behaviors within purpose-seeking and existence. Examples of spiritual behaviors are hope, resiliency, and value-based support for discovering and acting on ways to thrive. Spirituality empowers meaningfulness within performance.…
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How Light Can Improve Sleep and Overall Health

How Light Can Improve Sleep and Overall Health

HR Academy, Occupational
Light may lull the troubled sleeper right to sleep! Prior to the discovery of electricity, light from the sun controlled sleep-wake cycles.  Artificial light disrupts this natural rhythm, not only in our external environment but also inside our bodies. Questions to Ask: Are you aware of outdoor lighting conditions? What effect does indoor lighting have on you? Do you feel sleepy when it gets dark outside? What time do you shut off electronic screens (TV, phone, computer)? The Circadian System Our circadian system controls the processes within our body that follow a 24-hour cycle: hormone regulation, body temperature, and sleep/wake cycles. How Light Affects the Circadian System A collection of cells called the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) send signals throughout our body to help regulate us to our 24-hour day. Light travels…
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Design for Physical Environment, Work Attitudes, and Wellbeing

Design for Physical Environment, Work Attitudes, and Wellbeing

Emotional
Interior design is a rewarding way to nourish behaviors. Rooms or offices designed with the user meets personal needs by aesthetics and task functionality. The insight of a designer facilitates the 'look' and furnishings, yet an opinion without understanding performance restraints functionality unique to the user. A relationships exists between the physical environment, work attitudes and wellbeing (Hammon and Jones, 2013). Aesthetics prime feelings and direct behaviors. When a steady grip is on a hot beverage then perception of peer attitudes sway towards warm, friendly (Bargh, 2008). The opposite is true with a cold beverage. Sight perception may trigger a responses for safety, avoidance, or adversity. A practical approach to creating or organizing a work space is to fist explore then identify work task elements. These may include time demands, stage…
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Three Tips For Embracing Uncertainty to Improve Performance

Three Tips For Embracing Uncertainty to Improve Performance

Intellectual
Being open to the messiness of uncertainty is often difficult. Performance behaviors are patterns, routines, and habits. With challenges a natural course of reaction is common. An issue may be some behaviors are causing breaks in relationships, purpose, and health. With time and effort behaviors may change to repair and support teamwork, productivity, and competitive advantages. Performance sharpens by accepting ambiguity. Embracing mystery will build relationships, enhance purpose, and improve skills. Sensations following feelings to what may appear as a fuzzy or messy issue are often uncomfortable. Fear or doubt causes periods of rationalizing perceived risk factors. Sociology and psychologist author Malcolm Gladwell, psychologist Daniel Kahneman, and business woman Arianna Huffington revealed how sensations effect rational. Build Relationships "Good teaching is interactive. It engages the child individually. " Gladwell coined the Stickiness…
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Live and Learn

Live and Learn

Physical
To say, 'live and learn' is all toooo cliche, yet so true! Here's an example of a recent teachable moment plus five steps to reduce being unaware of what life may be teaching you. It began with how often I use my pool. You see, I moved into a new place just over a year ago.  Initially, I envisioned living near the ocean with a roommate to balance out the cost of additional preferences. I ended up with a better option: my own space with a pool. It took me nine months to use it! Now, this is odd because one way I calm myself is by touch, so my quick go-to may be a soft blanket, a hug or a bath.  Daily I gazed past the function of the pool with…
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Peers In the Workplace That Are Recovering From Trauma

Peers In the Workplace That Are Recovering From Trauma

Occupational
Peers in the workplace that are recovering from trauma will have difficulty verbalizing their emotions or even a simple thought (VanderKolk, 2014).  There is an uncertainty about life that confuses as they sort through their trauma.  With time and repetition, their communication patterns will slowly form into crisp, clear, confidant responses. Confidence often comes after strategy. Chess is a great example of strategy. Wikipedia enlightens on the historical game of chess, once called curling: a great deal of strategy and teamwork goes into choosing the ideal path and placement of a stone for each situation, and the skills of the curlers determine how close to the desired result the stone will achieve. Workplace culture words optimize strategies. Teamwork helps but listening and comprehension is key.  A safe environment and it's objects enable trust.…
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Why Contextual Factors Improve Workplace Performance and Design

Why Contextual Factors Improve Workplace Performance and Design

HR Academy, Workplace
Contextual factors is a term rarely used in the workplace or with employee performance. It is one of three factors that categorizes performance elements for improving performance outcomes. Any feature of yourself that is not part of a health condition or health status is defined as the personal context that influences performance (WHO 2001). Our performance and design coaches facilitate improvements through the following contextual elements: Expectations of Culture, Personal Beliefs and Customs, Behavioral Standards, Demographics, Stage of Life and History, Relationship to Time, and The Non-Physical: Simulated, Real-time, and Near-time. Gender and education levels are demographics that overlap into personal beliefs and customs. Context at an organizational level includes millennial, generation X, baby boomer, retired or volunteer life stages. 'Supervisor' may be a cultural custom or expectation of rank…
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Six Key Employee and Workplace Contextual Elements

Six Key Employee and Workplace Contextual Elements

HR Academy, Spiritual
There are workplaces with a culture expectation of work tracked by shift hours or a behavior standard to cover all tattoos. A workplace belief and custom may be whispering through cubicle workstations. These are examples of contextual elements in the workplace. Context is one of three performance factors used to improve performance outcomes. Contextual elements identify opportunities for education, employment and economic support as accepted by the culture in which one is a member. Context is one of three performance factors to divide performance into behavior-specific elements. The elements categorized as contextual include: expectations of culture, personal beliefs and customs, behavioral standards, demographics, stage of life and history, and relationship to time.   Occupation and sense are the additional factors to organizing performance elements. The context factor digs into workplace policy…
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Wall Alerts

Wall Alerts

Intellectual
I don't know about you but when I need to change without waiver I need the end goal to be on repeat in my mind. To do this I surround myself with what will inspire change. The first time I knowingly created wall alerts was when I was in middle school. Every inch of my walls were covered with images and words that inspired me to be more creative, to be more healthy.  Perhaps,  not the most glamorous work of art at the time but I genuinely reached my heart through various mediums to gain loving self-support towards change. Thirty years later I still do this because it works! Creative wall alerts may be designed unique to your need and style while exploring the use of a variety of mediums.…
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REM and Non-REM Sleep Improves Three Performance Behaviors

REM and Non-REM Sleep Improves Three Performance Behaviors

Physical
If work performance is a struggle consider sleep hygiene through establishing nighttime and daytime habits. The body is capable of waking up to 10 minutes prior to the desired morning time without an alarm clock. Non-REM sleep is a slow-wave type of sleep and REM is characterized by rapid eye movement, dreaming and more body movement. Sleep deprivation causes the brain to activate sleep rebound or pressure responses. Sleep in a quiet environment with dark drapes and at a temperature set at 69 degrees to support the three actionable performance behaviors below. Intellectual Behavior Estimating time is a skill that improves as we age but sleep also triggers this skill (Aritake and  Higuchi 2012). Both non-REM and REM sleep supports intellectual performance. In addition to time management it supports short and long term…
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Base Color on Emotional Solution

Base Color on Emotional Solution

Emotional
If you have the time, go to Google Images to search 'earth tones'.  The top 10 images include graphic design, tile, fabric, craft ink, stamp ink, fine art, a social website, makeup, and the Earthtones CD cover is, of course, earth tones. Creative use of color may be one tool to living healthier. Here are five considerations to base color on emotional solutions. When it comes to bedroom design, the Home Buying Institute says, "Earth tones are always a safe color that will appeal to the majority." The San Francisco Gate nods to this idea, including that "earth tones are frequently used in craftsman, bungalow and modern architecture. Light earth tones in shades of sand or beige help a small bedroom look larger and brighter." In fashion, earth tones are ever present. They…
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Surrounded by Four Walls

Surrounded by Four Walls

Occupational
The best canvas in a room is a wall. Instead of believing you're surrounded by four walls, consider the ways you could put writing on the wall.  It's a designed greeting to direct the success you imagine. Below are ideas to get your creative started... [caption id="" align="aligncenter" width="700"] DESIGN^under-responsive | Resting room designed with consideration for your best self if muted or delayed responses to daily sensory events[/caption] [caption id="" align="aligncenter" width="736"] DESIGN^sensory craving | bedroom design consideration to achieve your best self if with an insatiable drive for enhanced sensory experiences[/caption] [caption id="" align="aligncenter" width="736"] DESIGN^taste | ideas relevant to negative, avoidant, aversive, or defensive behaviors for food prep sensitivities.[/caption]
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When Work Routines Are Necessary or Not

When Work Routines Are Necessary or Not

HR Academy, Intellectual
Creating routines improves performance because by nature it becomes a habit. Being of a curious nature provides moments of drifting off a routine path. This initially offers excitement and may lead to altering a routine. It may also result in suffering. There's risk in drifting off routine, yet there is reward with sticking to them. Routines create commitment. It may be a cultural routine which often is temporary. However, routines are patterns of behavior that are observable, regular, repetitive and provide structure for daily life.* Psychology Today presented how people often change in unpredictable ways over time.  "Ultimately, of course, we bear the responsibility for who we are. But the way we influence who we are isn't by simply deciding to be different. We have to be clever. We have to pull…
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Interior Design for Positive Aspects

Interior Design for Positive Aspects

Spiritual
The first reflection of a person is said to be witnessed in a still, calm body of water. Following, craftsmen caught onto the fact that a polished stone, like copper and bronze, provided much sought after mirrors for grooming. Today the task of mirrors reaches beyond your reflection to reflect your best self in metaphor or form. Reflection also takes shape as a thought, value or goal. When your arrow aims at healthy roles, habits and performance, then design your environment to support following through at your very best.  Steelcase recently blogged on their 360 Research page that wellbeing is systematic and holistic. "The team went on to conclude that the places where people come together to work can be designed to have a positive impact on a variety of dimensions of worker…
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Selflessness as Free Medicine

Selflessness as Free Medicine

Occupational
When you get stuck in a rut and are so so stressed out how do you feel? At a pivotal point in my life ten years ago my feelings kicked me into action mode. I believed the stride required being alone but chose environments that supported healthy healing to cope through the stress. Loneliness lengthened my healing process. We are relational beings. Once I learned a method to break down self-judgement and shame I slowly invited others into my life. This action taught selflessness. Lets look at how research supports selflessness as free medicine to mind, body, soul. Giving or sharing is an innate feeling (Brown 2003). Like all other behaviors it requires acting on the feeling over time to become a skill, habit, pattern. Sharing space with others improves the…
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Body Mechanics to Better Your Health

Body Mechanics to Better Your Health

HR Academy, Occupational
Form and function are two basic principles to designing objects. Function may include the dimensions for an intended space or the comfort to sit for long periods of time.  Examples of form include drawer pulls, scissors, or a chair. Each of these examples beg for both a formula perspective: form + function. Buying furniture or interior decorating is like dating. One may think an object is the perfect partner but it may not last.  A chair that fits perfectly with an heirloom desk may cause back discomfort. Relationships are desirable when unity is present. Aging and routine resistance training cause muscles to build and weaken unevenly (Degens and Erkins 2009). Disturbances in the skeletal system may be caused by disproportionate muscle strength.  This may lead to joint, tendon, nerve, and tissue damage.…
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Distraction Coping Strategy To Avoid Becoming Overwhelmed

Distraction Coping Strategy To Avoid Becoming Overwhelmed

Emotional, HR Academy
Grounding is a distraction coping strategy that changes inward focus outward. Two of the three ways involve what's in your line of sight or objects you are in direct contact with. It anchors the mind to present realities. This coping strategy works best before or just when emotions begin to feel overwhelming. People who practice this strategy use one of three methods that works best for them: mental, physical, or soothing. Each offers about ten tactics to build outward focus. Rate your emotional pain and current mood to begin any of the three methods. Keep your eyes open to scan your immediate surroundings. Visual aspects of Grounding are more prominent in the mental and physical methods. A soothing plan may be a safe retreat, like a pedicure or a hot shower. Mental grounding…
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The Clear Advantage To a Furnished Space with Inspiring Objects

The Clear Advantage To a Furnished Space with Inspiring Objects

HR Academy, Spiritual
What's to do with years of old memorabilia?  Often I strongly consider burying my journals and random objects of meaning in a time capsule. Are objects worthwhile to keep for security of feelings? Five years ago this month I began to travel with only one carry-on. The trail-hopping between furnished temporary living quarters was freeing and challenging. Prior to leaving my home state I shed furnishings, products, and clothes to simplify my valuables into as few storage bins as possible.  Recently all six bins shipped from Michigan to Los Angeles. Immediately I sold the emptied bins on Craigslist for a bundle deal of $50. The need to rekindle with my old belongings was met. An outpour of feelings while combing through old memorabilia caused questioning: Why keep past objects within view? The energy that…
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The Wellbeing Tactic of Conserving Energy

The Wellbeing Tactic of Conserving Energy

Physical
Last night my brother-in-law asked my opinion on the blueprint for their kitchen. It's naked to the studs with an open map to plan task paths. We moved the location of light switches, refrigerator, dishwasher and talked through the ergonomics of a built-in nook. The emphasis here wasn't only ergonomics but their lifestyle, functionality and how to best conserve body energy . Built-in environments benefit from incorporating the wellbeing tactic of conserving energy.  This strategy reduces the onset of fatigue. Energy Conservation Techniques (ECT) prevent illness and injury. This occupational science study shares successful outcomes for a group who implemented ECT through occupational therapy guidance. Below are four principles the UofM Inpatient Acute Care team endorses: PACE Stop. Rest before you get fatigued.  It is easier to recover your energy by avoiding to work until fatigued. …
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How To Quit Smoking

How To Quit Smoking

Feature
Smoking isn't healthy but it kept me sane. It was a deadly habit but it helped me thrive professionally, socially and oddly enough, athletically. I loved to smoke and didn't attempt to quit until the day I stopped 'cold turkey'.  The miracle in this was I lost the urge to smoke but I gained a body that was unable to cope with stress. What I did: smoke to cope. Our hormones are what regulates stress. Everyone doesn't have the same hormone secretion so our level of what is stressful can vary. This is significant to how an individual will react within the fight-or-flight response. How to quit smoking is similar to unravelling a ball of yarn from a neatly organized ball. My late teens, twenties then just into my thirties were…
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Create a Trust Environment

Create a Trust Environment

HR Academy, Intellectual
I remember what I was wearing, the room I was in, the furniture, the color...the smells. Past memories surface when least expected. In a fleeting moment confusion may occur. The mind races towards how to direct behavior. A task or person may trigger past trauma, pain, or uneasy sensory memories. Aware or not, everything registers in to the brain as a memory (ASA 2014). So colors, objects, people, patterns - anything in the line of sight (and peripherally), smell, taste - all registers as 'data'. The brain organizes this information to use as a response behavior. Trust is included in the life memory bank. Comfort, safety, restful environments or things are included as trustful. This intellectually driven method aids to establish trust. Conflict resists trust. The brain organizes conflict into 'fight'…
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Color and Pattern Relationship to Life Experiences

Color and Pattern Relationship to Life Experiences

Feature
The human eye can see over 7 million colors. Visual stimulation is fascinating.  On top of that, we can see patterns (2D) and texture (3D).  Plus, wall colors and patterns can really change a room’s atmosphere. Colors such as sage green and soft blue are particularly calming to me. Perhaps, these colors remind me of a green grass knolls and the endless blue sky. Neutral colors in particular can calm your senses as well.  In contrary, colors such as bright red, orange, electric (neon) yellow or pink may be quite exhilarating. I like wearing these colors to work out. Not to mention, it might prevent a car from hitting me when I'm on the road.  Polka dots, contrasting checkered bright colors can be very alarming or alerting.  There are patterns…
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What It Takes To Sleep

What It Takes To Sleep

Physical
Our sleep patterns are effected by stress, our daily activities and prep-for-bed routines. Here's what it takes to sleep by visiting our sleep environments: The National Sleep Foundation Sleep Report Card states that 90% people watch TV before going to bed, 33% are on the computer.  Their Fact Sheet states the bedroom is for two things only: sleep and sex. Their tip: Create a sleep-conducive environment that is dark, quiet and comfortable. Think window treatment fabric and quality, materials to dampen sound (i.e.: carpet, wall insulation, noise-reduction product). Know sleep and rest are an occupation you're responsible for. Understand your sensory needs then create sleep and rest environments to support an ease into sleep, to maintain sleep without disturbance, to accomplish a full night (7 to 8 hours) of sleep. Examples of sensory…
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Why Carving Is A Heartfelt Emotion

Why Carving Is A Heartfelt Emotion

Emotional
Carving is a whole body activity. Cavemen used their large muscles to express themselves. To scratch the surface on emotions of survival, fear, and birth was their healing agent. Art Collectors adore carved walls and artifacts. These objects travel in museum exhibits around the globe. A favorite pub of mine has carved names on the walls and tables. Carving is an animated gesture that expresses heartfelt emotion. Handwriting styles, names and graphics offer speculation of what each story is telling. Is it joy? Love? A day of victory? One with fear? Houses need to be built on material recommended based on the geography and soil. It's not always cement! The soil may need wood stilts. Homeowners attracted to different materials that aren't suited for a building site will cause a house to collapse. Following the foundation is the frame. Homeowners can speak…
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What Is The Culprit to Behaviors You Want To Stop?

What Is The Culprit to Behaviors You Want To Stop?

Emotional
History is an incredible occurrence that shapes everything to stand with remarkable uniqueness. How often do you stop to consider something or someone's history? An example of a 'something' are words. Vocabulary history is acquired through selective listening and reading or engrained through cultural norms. The history of common words - like connection, originated with different spelling (connectere) then morph from their homeland (Latin - connexio) into new cultures (English - connect). In consideration of the history of 'someone' a form of history measurement may be through behaviors. Behavior responses may change as demonstrated by designs preferred, the slang spoken, the people or cultures valued for purposeful sharing. Behaviors lead to daily choices and then return as life history. The history of brain growth shares commonalities with the life of the 'something' and 'someone'…
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What Is Sensory Regulation?

What Is Sensory Regulation?

HR Academy, Intellectual
What is sensory regulation and why is health and design related to it?  Design thinking through a health lens improves sensory knowledge and design sensibility. Think of those drinking excessive amounts of coffee or caffeinated beverages.  Or those with unusual sleeping habits. Perhaps, extreme energy levels - all time high or extreme lows. These examples touch on a lengthy list of symptoms that signals warning. The brain's response to sensations seeks its idea of appropriate and efficient. This may not agree with societal or desired standards. Sensory regulation is the way the brain and nervous system manages sensations. These sensations return as behaviors. Our sense reaction triggers the nervous system to sends millions of recorded and encoded messages to the brain, Touch, smell, taste, vision, hearing, vestibular, proprioceptive, interoceptive systems…
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Texture May Arouse Emotional Workplace Behaviors

Texture May Arouse Emotional Workplace Behaviors

Emotional, HR Academy
Texture is full of variance. It has pattern, color, material, and weight. Have you considered using it for shock value? One way to form a memory is by shocking our nervous system. Our response to seeing an appealing texture is to touch it. Something soft but feels like sandpaper will leave a lasting impression. It may sound harsh but in the right context it works! Our brain's plasticity allows us to change unhealthy behaviors.  It first detects, then reacts to sensations. Detection occurs on an unconscious level. Reaction is what fosters a behavior. Texture is just one way to access our millions of neurological functions in pursuit of changing behavior. Texture may intensify emotion within workplace behaviors. Daily, excessive tasks including products like seating, office equipment, even writing tools can cause…
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