Master Stress-management With A Multi-Dimensional Approach

Master Stress-management With A Multi-Dimensional Approach

  When walking stairs the body needs to balance on one foot in order to lift the other in motion upward or downward. Eventually both feet land on one surface. Learning how to master taking a step is multi-dimensional. It requires physical, intellectual, and emotional performance. Mastering managing stress is multi-dimensional. The following story illustrates two different reactions to stress: One adult recalled that her father was a friendly, loud, active man who loved to play with her in a very active way when she was small, picking her up and tossing her in the air. Unfortunately, this woman was severely gravitationally insecure, so every time he did this she was terrified, and she hated having him come near her as she did not know when she would be tossed about. Her father felt rejected by her response and eventually gave up interacting with her, resulting in a significant emotional distance between them. She recalled one particular day, when in exasperation, her father told her,...
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Design for Physical Environment, Work Attitudes, and Wellbeing

Design for Physical Environment, Work Attitudes, and Wellbeing

Interior design is a rewarding way to nourish behaviors. Rooms or offices designed with the user meets personal needs by aesthetics and task functionality. The insight of a designer facilitates the 'look' and furnishings, yet an opinion without understanding performance restraints functionality unique to the user. A relationships exists between the physical environment, work attitudes and wellbeing (Hammon and Jones, 2013). Aesthetics prime feelings and direct behaviors. When a steady grip is on a hot beverage then perception of peer attitudes sway towards warm, friendly (Bargh, 2008). The opposite is true with a cold beverage. Sight perception may trigger a responses for safety, avoidance, or adversity. A practical approach to creating or organizing a work space is to fist explore then identify work task elements. These may include time demands, stage of life, natural lighting, and body regulation. Secondly, observe reactions to color, form, object scale, and lighting. WholeBeSM Design Toolkit identifies specific performance elements unique to work roles, work space, and performance behaviors. Our performance...
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Seven Steps That will Reduce Debilitating Stress and Fear

Seven Steps That will Reduce Debilitating Stress and Fear

Last week a group of women revealed the frustration of relational stress. Following our discussion it was revealed the cause of high stress was poor communication. The computer, cell phone, landline, and various wireless signals are convenient replacements to connecting in person. Each severely lowers body movement, including a stroll or brisk walk to meet a peer within a building or even the body mechanics to drive to a meeting. Anxiety disorders are rising in the United States and social media is one mechanism that is pulling the trigger. 40 million American adults fall into debilitating uncertainty or fear (NIMH). Social norms are to seek visual or audible rewards from screens. Coping weighs on the amount of those rewards are received each day. Emotional processing is quickly steering away from inward reflection for outward expression by catloging feelings in ink, graphic, and other creative mediums. Screens and keyboards are slowly replacing nourishing handwritten thoughts, sketched imagery, and hand-crafted tokens of appreciation to mail by parcel....
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How Design Sensibility Impacts Performance Outcomes

How Design Sensibility Impacts Performance Outcomes

Dancing without music may appear as silly or odd. Dancing needs guided rhythm and music ignites an internal rhythm that may be expressed with movement. Design Sensibility unites mediums with sensations for best performance. The ability to improve performance through responses to sensations, complex emotional or aesthetic influences through the use of context, occupation and sense factors is design sensibility. Performance barriers may exist and misguide behavior responses including attention or situational discernment. Design sensibility offers the ability to detect an issue, identify an issue, then solve the issue. When athletes strengthen skill they first recognize their weakness. Scientists identify that when performance focused attention is externally rather than internally then performance is enhanced. If a sprinter's speed weakness then with design sensibility they may ignite a mindset to 'imagine the ground as a hotplate' in place of 'striking with your forefoot'. In parallel, an example to strengthen performance skill may be a mindset 'imagining words are ten dollars a piece' in...
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How to Respectfully Unmask Genuine Feelings in the Workplace

How to Respectfully Unmask Genuine Feelings in the Workplace

Genuine feelings are often masked. This typically occurs when the perceived mood, time or environment may increase stress if honest feedback is shared verses being agreeable. Mood is subjective. When gauging the mood of an individual there's great opportunity of being completely wrong. With practice, time, and awareness to emotional responses there may be a brief, yet genuine exchange in sharing feelings. Skilled active listeners and emotionally healthy individuals are capable of detecting falsehoods in emotional responses. Sensory sensitive human beings are roughly 20% of the population (Acevedo 2014). A human's sense is fascinating. Those who have a difficult time trusting intuitive messages may read facial expressions or follow voice tone inflection to perceive one's mood. Active listeners may identify complexities rise when a genuine mood is masked due to perceived or actual behavior standards. Perceptions may be respectful or deceitful when behavior standards are diverse. When intuition is trusted it alerts apparent differences between reality and falsehood. Improving emotional wellbeing includes improving attention to...
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Being Tolerable When the Unexpected Keeps Occurring

Being Tolerable When the Unexpected Keeps Occurring

Tolerance is more frequently used as a stepping stone for social issues. It initiates a conversation about change. Awareness of differences, integration, and celebration of these differences are all aspects of being tolerable. It can be a bad email, or a peer with an opposing viewpoint. Sometimes an extra task to support a sick colleague is the case. Often these are examples of being tolerable. But does it end there? Performing day-in-day-out tasks are often part of a day's plan. There was time for forethought and scheduling around and for these tasks. Adding tolerating nuances will use extra energy originally reserved for what was planned. An added deadline might be the final straw to emotionally snapping. Questions to Ask: What does tolerance look like in your workplace? What appears to repeatedly and unexpectedly interfere with planned work? How does this effect the energy reserved for planned work? Being tolerable of not controlling or having power over...
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Relationship Is Based On Respect Not Power

Relationship Is Based On Respect Not Power

Healthy relationships rely on effective communication strategies. The most effective communicators are also good listeners (Zemke et al 2000). With objective communication a relationship is based on respect not power, manipulation, or punishment. Below are objective communication examples. Effective communication tactics enable us to be better listeners while we help our client's achieve their goals. RESPOND EMPATHETICALLY Listen with full attention, eye contact and body language Acknowledge feelings with a word Give their feelings a name. Reflect back their feelings Give them their wishes in fantasy Start with an empathetic word ("this is tough/sad/too bad") and then ask gently, "what are you going to do?" or "What can you do?" Deliver empathy and state the limit ENGAGE COOPERATION Non-productive: blaming and accusing, name calling, threats, commands, lectures and moralizing, warnings, playing the martyr, comparing, sarcasm, prophesying, questions, bribing/cajoling Encouraging: describe the problem, give information, give choices, say it with a word, talk about feelings, write a note, change if/then to when/then, use 'after' (we will...), sing, use modified threats PUNISHMENT ALTERNATIVES...
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One Free Performance Resource For The Active Listener

One Free Performance Resource For The Active Listener

Often it is unsettling to listen to the ache in the voice of a peer sharing sorrowful or traumatic news. The pain conveyed in their dilemma may even be palpable. One effective way of coping as an active listener is meditation. The health benefits of meditation continue to flood data supporting how it is a necessary resource for developing brain function. Meditation supports emotional regulation because it functions as a brain support for coping with dilemmas including: pain tolerance, emotional control, feelings of tension, external distractions, fear of unknowns, physical issues, absenteeism, and awareness of genetic diseases. Questions to Ask: How is quiet time incorporated into the work day? What resources may support incorporating meditation into each day? Why might active listening to the mind be a support for reducing...
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What Is In Sight May Distract You

What Is In Sight May Distract You

Try this: stand up, feet together, then close your eyes. Attempt to stay that way as long as your able to tolerate it while taking note to the feelings your body feeds you. Sight uses one of ten body structures in our Autonomic Nervous System (ANS). It maintains and coordinates body functions. Researchers identified how sight effects organs phases of rest and activity. Below is the results (Willbarger and Willbarger 2012). Structure  | Rest & Digest | Fight-Flight Iris (eye muscle)| Pupil constriction | Pupil dilation Heart  | Rate & force decrease | Rate & force increase Stomach  | Increase peristalsis | Reduce peristalsis Lung  | Bronchial muscle contracts | Bronchial muscle relax Small Intestine | Digestion increase | Motility reduce Large Intestine  | Secretion/motility increase | Motility reduce Liver  | Antagonistic to glycogen | Conversion of glycogen ...
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Respond to Anger with Kindness

Respond to Anger with Kindness

We are unique! Our behaviors respond in different ways. At work leaders may tell you to respond to anger with kindness.  Effective communication is often interpreted as kindness. Put down the mental shot gun of using feelings about the subject, current mood, and impressions to achieve this (Kahneman 2011). Begin with understanding one's true nature. We respond with harmony or discord. Understanding one's personality and temperament helps develop healthy relationships. It enhances goal achievement. It enables you to respond to anger with kindness! If knowing one's true nature sounds like a winning solution to you, below is personality and temperament descriptives. Personality A collective of an individual's attitudes, behavioral patterns, emotional responses, social roles and other individual traits that are innate, predisposed and endure over a long period of time. We recharge one of two ways: as an extrovert or an introvert. Extroverts What: they gain their energy by being with other people, find it exhausting to be alone, need people to help them think through their problems,...
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Selflessness as Free Medicine

Selflessness as Free Medicine

When you get stuck in a rut and are so so stressed out how do you feel? At a pivotal point in my life ten years ago my feelings kicked me into action mode. I believed the stride required being alone but chose environments that supported healthy healing to cope through the stress. Loneliness lengthened my healing process. We are relational beings. Once I learned a method to break down self-judgement and shame I slowly invited others into my life. This action taught selflessness. Lets look at how research supports selflessness as free medicine to mind, body, soul. Giving or sharing is an innate feeling (Brown 2003). Like all other behaviors it requires acting on the feeling over time to become a skill, habit, pattern. Sharing space with others improves the immune system, sleep, and circulation (Cohen et. al 2005). Unselfish kindness and warmth towards all people reduces cellular aging and lengthens life (Hoge et. al 2013). Incorporate the fullness of what...
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Why Self-monitoring Is Most Important to Measure Responsiveness

Why Self-monitoring Is Most Important to Measure Responsiveness

A thirty-one year old Client was being supplemented by three liters of oxygen 24 hours a day. One day the tank wasn't turned on for the first thirty minutes of our time together. This occurrence is equivalent to a healthy body surviving one day on three ounces of water - including shower water. Have you heard of a pulsoximeter? It's a handheld device that hugs a finger tip to measure the percentage of oxygen in your blood stream. They are everywhere in the health care industry but used most often for those that require oxygen supplemented. The body's oxygen saturation is adequate for the organs to thrive when it registers above 96%. Oxygen reduces pain, nourishes blood, feeds your immune system, keeps your brain healthy, provides energy...only to name a few of the lifestyle assets it beholds. Self monitoring is a powerful tool that will define facts and feelings of our reality. This day I repeatedly checked the oxygen saturation level on the pulsoximeter but...
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Sensation to React

Sensation to React

Being sensory defensive is a behavior response to stimulus - like noise, visual cues, textures, or touch. Certain stimulus may create barriers to performance. Occupational therapists are trained to identify ways to modulate the body or modify an environment for reducing the ugly effects or sensory defensive behaviors. We receive sensory defensiveness certification once we learn how to identify unique strategies that may change reactions to stimulus. Role-playing scenarios provides compassion for individuals struggling with defensive behaviors. One challenge was to lead a peer outdoors. Over ten minutes their eyes remained closed while the leader had free reign to command them to reach, stoop, step...any action to challenge a sensory experience into feeling lost or without defense. The central nervous system gives the body an ability to sense the respond. Responsive behaviors are to foster feeling safe and comfortable. Coping techniques adjust feelings of fear or anxiety towards the sense of being calm and in control. Forms occupying work spaces may directly effect open or...
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Why Replacing Rules with Values Replaces Wisdom with Expertise

Why Replacing Rules with Values Replaces Wisdom with Expertise

We kick around the terms wise and expert when claiming a person's character. The word 'Ecclesiastes' means teacher. This biblical book endorses wisdom for a well-lived life.  Wisdom is acquiring knowledge by experiencing and exploring all the resources. 'Expertise' is a claim for being the best at systematic thinking or beliefs. Individuals who are wise aren't necessarily experts. Health claims about products, strategies, or environmental effects aren't all in agreement. One individual may follow their curiosity with discernment to challenge their doubts and beliefs. Another may follow curiosity along one belief, quick to deny entertaining alternatives. Some examples are health supplements, medication, diet, or types of fitness. The art of persuasion is a daily occurrence. Internal conflict is experienced when a behavior is scolded from a resource that is inconsistent in their behavior. Persuasion may break belief, values or trust with residual unsettling feelings. Those who experienced a forceful 'time-out' as a child because they modeled an adult's behavior may relate here. Persuasive...
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The Clear Advantage To a Furnished Space with Inspiring Objects

The Clear Advantage To a Furnished Space with Inspiring Objects

What's to do with years of old memorabilia?  Often I strongly consider burying my journals and random objects of meaning in a time capsule. Are objects worthwhile to keep for security of feelings? Five years ago this month I began to travel with only one carry-on. The trail-hopping between furnished temporary living quarters was freeing and challenging. Prior to leaving my home state I shed furnishings, products, and clothes to simplify my valuables into as few storage bins as possible.  Recently all six bins shipped from Michigan to Los Angeles. Immediately I sold the emptied bins on Craigslist for a bundle deal of $50. The need to rekindle with my old belongings was met. An outpour of feelings while combing through old memorabilia caused questioning: Why keep past objects within view? The energy that arrives when viewing objects or words from the past may be as resourceful as your best friend. An object brings feelings that are associate with it - a celebration, a death, a transition in life....
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Journaling Proved To Heal Shame Trapped in the Past

Journaling Proved To Heal Shame Trapped in the Past

Journaling has been my inconsistent therapeutic remedy. Its evidence my first journal was truly a diary. At age nine my way of communicating was blathering about nothings in between short stories of play dates or family folly. Friends allowed to read my Diary represented a sort-of friendship hierarchy. It was evident I was first emotionally inept from heavy hand, dark-leaded big words or a scribbled frenzy of characters and shapes. Some pages have a word written over and over until the page forced an end to that silliness. Over time a diary became a journal, stories took shape with meaning and depth. The discovery of my emotional journey was in part to chronologically reading them as a script to my life. Sadness overtook me when an eighth of the pages were ripped out. Likely this was ex designated to be forgotten. The journal with clippings from magazines was the life chapter of financial hardship, dreams of luxuries. Half-hazard collages and drawings represented that season...
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