How To Improve Confidence by Estimating Time Accurately

How To Improve Confidence by Estimating Time Accurately

With setting goals a timeline and deadline is created. Estimating time accurately is a skill that begins with childhood activities including board games and getting ready for school. It may improve or weaken depending on the practice how frequently it's practiced. Skills improve with practice. The ability to make accurate estimates is closely tied to the ability to understand and solve problems. Learning to approximate activity lengths prepares for future goal setting. Poor time estimation weakens confidence because short and long-term goals are repeatedly missed. The mind processes stories with better recall then it does with time estimation. Estimating measurements is most often a mathematical skill, which improves with practice. Illusions often stand in the way. Stories may offer an illusion of time that exaggerates the effect of changing circumstances on future performance. Illusions, or the suggestiveness of imagination, has risks. The skill of intuitiveness is different because it uses a different part of the brain to measure risk. Still, it in't an exact science. "Nothing in life is as...
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Master Stress-management With A Multi-Dimensional Approach

Master Stress-management With A Multi-Dimensional Approach

  When walking stairs the body needs to balance on one foot in order to lift the other in motion upward or downward. Eventually both feet land on one surface. Learning how to master taking a step is multi-dimensional. It requires physical, intellectual, and emotional performance. Mastering managing stress is multi-dimensional. The following story illustrates two different reactions to stress: One adult recalled that her father was a friendly, loud, active man who loved to play with her in a very active way when she was small, picking her up and tossing her in the air. Unfortunately, this woman was severely gravitationally insecure, so every time he did this she was terrified, and she hated having him come near her as she did not know when she would be tossed about. Her father felt rejected by her response and eventually gave up interacting with her, resulting in a significant emotional distance between them. She recalled one particular day, when in exasperation, her father told her,...
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What Distorted Thinking Is and How To Stop It

What Distorted Thinking Is and How To Stop It

In the past there were few classrooms or households teaching exactly what a healthy relationship is. Parents may model valuable aspects but don't physically sit down with their children as teachers of Relationships 101. A healthy relationship from 'the inside out' identifies what communication can become. Healthy relationships begin with an honest self assessment. It requires being prepared for a life-long journey of education. It is effortful work, time and awareness to identify then replace distorted information that the mind believes as truth. There are many layers to replacing distorted thinking. Author and professor Benjamin K. Bergen explains in Louder than Words that we simulate experiences, actions and performances in our mind through a scientifically proven process called embodied simulation. "Meaning, according to the embodied simulation hypothesis, isn’t just abstract mental symbols; it’s a creative process, in which people construct virtual experiences—embodied simulations—in their mind’s eye." (Scientific American, 2012) Bergen identifies that we do this deep within our brain processes, during our waking and sleeping hours. Therefore, mental...
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How to Avoid Missing What Someone Has Said

How to Avoid Missing What Someone Has Said

Active listening in it's most proper form fatigues the mind as the day moves forward. Performance functions at peak level when not multi-tasking, therefore engaging active listening is with in a posture and intent to hear and understand. Our ear's physiology is fascinating. It holds the smallest bone in the body. Sound separates into vibrations by hair fiber movement. Each ear has a relay station that splits into two pathway's to filter sounds. The paths cross hemispheres to recognize, distinguish, and filter auditory information. Sound localization, pattern recognition, timing, and balance are main processes of the ear. Our shoulders, neck, head, eyes and lips are the asset here. Social listening often includes head movement. Examples include nodding yes or tilting the head in compassion. These movements send messages to your brain that affect the inner ear. If word recognition is a noticeable issue then create the habit of intentionally positioning the body to observe every gesture. Free visual span from moving objects or...
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Gestalt Principles in Daily Life

Gestalt Principles in Daily Life

Gestalt isn't a regularly used term. Out WholeBeSM method repeatedly engages design sensibility to enable stress management. The following definitions explain why gestalt is so important and meaningful in your everyday life. The universal root + definition of Gestalt GERMAN | gestalt {form, shape} In 1920, German psychologists used this term when describing something that is greater or different than the sum of it's parts. Something that is unexplainable through depiction of it's parts. Unified in physical, psychological or symbolic elements to create a whole Charlotte Bunch once said, "Feminism is an entire world view or gestalt, not just a laundry list of women's issues." Artists and designers trigger "gestalt sightings" of something that isn't finished. However, your mind still connects it.  An example is: conn_ct_d   Your mind fills in the blanks. Our mind identifies a missing link and then completes it. This is something our  senses naturally do. Gestalt principles in daily life include continually filling in those blanks through being aware of...
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Loyalty in Life

Loyalty in Life

The word "loyalty" has deep roots. "Loyalty in life" involves perception and emotion. It's similar to allegiance and includes a sense of duty. At times our behavior isn't loyal to our values. Like snapping at someone you love because you are sleep deprived or hungry. This is an example of how loyalty can waver due to poor self-regulation. Sleep is one of the first things to go as a result of job deadlines, travel or family obligations. Anxiety becomes the antagonist to lack of loyalty! GIG Design's WholeBeSM process recognizes the following six core aspects: Physical Occupational Intellectual Spiritual Social Emotional The first step is to recognize your self-regulation issues. Loyalty in life directly affects your health, your relationships, and your success. Design Sensibility is taught with our WholeBeSM Toolkits. Read more about our services. //  ...
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Synesthesia in Everyday Life

Synesthesia in Everyday Life

Who uses the word synesthesia? What does it even mean? Our WholeBeSM toolkits teach living with synesthesia for triggering design sensibility. Below is our explanation of the meaning of synesthesia: The universal root + definition of Synesthesia GREEK | syn {together} esthesia {to perceive, feel} a phenomenon in the ability to receive dual sensory impressions where one sensory organ stimulates another. terminology to describe an effect by using cross sensory domains Michael Haverkamp on Synesthesia "If the texture feels rough, I see a structure in my mind’s eye that has dark spots, hooks, and edges. But if it’s too smooth, the structure glows and looks papery, flimsy." Synesthesia in Everyday Life Cross opposites and life gets interesting. Imagine the following: loud yellow; rosemary comb; quiet triangle. Synesthesia in everyday life leads an imagination to revolutionary measures. Synesthesia can be like chocolate snowcaps. To get the sense of synesthesia learn Design Sensibility through our WholeBeSM Toolkit and coaching with the Equip Package. photo courtesy of @tangojuliet...
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REM and Non-REM Sleep Improves Three Performance Behaviors

REM and Non-REM Sleep Improves Three Performance Behaviors

If work performance is a struggle consider sleep hygiene through establishing nighttime and daytime habits. The body is capable of waking up to 10 minutes prior to the desired morning time without an alarm clock. Non-REM sleep is a slow-wave type of sleep and REM is characterized by rapid eye movement, dreaming and more body movement. Sleep deprivation causes the brain to activate sleep rebound or pressure responses. Sleep in a quiet environment with dark drapes and at a temperature set at 69 degrees to support the three actionable performance behaviors below. Intellectual Behavior Estimating time is a skill that improves as we age but sleep also triggers this skill (Aritake and  Higuchi 2012). Both non-REM and REM sleep supports intellectual performance. In addition to time management it supports short and long term memory. Physical Behavior Sufficient REM can nix the need for your alarm clock. Sleep disruption will respond with poor daytime performance (Trinidad and Miguel 2011). Reversely, inadequate daytime physical behaviors will impact as poor sleep hygiene. Emotional...
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Provoke Approval With Postured Assurance

Provoke Approval With Postured Assurance

Have you lived within a culture that isn't your own? Over the years I've been personally challenged through unfamiliar cultures. A few examples of cultures I need to adapt to includes an indian reservation, farming community, tourist town, and middle-eastern religions. Beyond the smells, language or customs just transitioning from a geographical move is tough! Overcoming adversity presents two choices: be open to it, or deny it. Choosing which path is the power to ultimately steer performance. Forethought is a natural impulse that digs into personal values, morals, and beliefs. That of openness or denial begins the body, mind and spirit path to performing towards positive outcomes. Even choosing an openness to drink from a new water source goes through the natural impulse of forethought. It subjects the digestive system to work through a new source that may or may not be good for the body. In this case, for some, denial may be the path for better health. One powerful...
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Post Traumatic Growth

Post Traumatic Growth

This last week while hiking in Connecticut, we came across a man that was hiking the entire Appalachian Trail.  He was asking some other hikers about the best type of hiking shoes and talked excitedly about an apple someone had just given him. We all were in awe at such an introspective and dedicated life choice.  Initially I was intrigued by this man’s story, what brought him to this point and well… a thousand more questions regarding logistics alone. The concept of moving and processing certainly goes together. But this man’s choice really isn't so far off from some of our own journeys. Recently, I heard someone say that we all have a turning point in our life.  We define ourselves by that turning point – essentially we view ourselves as being two different entities before and after that event. But it typically takes something to startle us, jolt us, move us. This event can help us evolve or stunt us from growing. When...
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Journaling Proved To Heal Shame Trapped in the Past

Journaling Proved To Heal Shame Trapped in the Past

Journaling has been my inconsistent therapeutic remedy. Its evidence my first journal was truly a diary. At age nine my way of communicating was blathering about nothings in between short stories of play dates or family folly. Friends allowed to read my Diary represented a sort-of friendship hierarchy. It was evident I was first emotionally inept from heavy hand, dark-leaded big words or a scribbled frenzy of characters and shapes. Some pages have a word written over and over until the page forced an end to that silliness. Over time a diary became a journal, stories took shape with meaning and depth. The discovery of my emotional journey was in part to chronologically reading them as a script to my life. Sadness overtook me when an eighth of the pages were ripped out. Likely this was ex designated to be forgotten. The journal with clippings from magazines was the life chapter of financial hardship, dreams of luxuries. Half-hazard collages and drawings represented that season...
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Cure Motion Sickness Instantly With This Controversial Remedy

Cure Motion Sickness Instantly With This Controversial Remedy

In my recent travels, I discovered that I had motion sickness.  It surprised me to learn the onset of this phenomenon can be during adulthood. People who were sensitive to motion sickness at a young age may grow out of it. I’ve always been able to handle roller coasters, swings and even cruises. Everyone of course has different thresholds. It wasn't until the speedy and rocky speedboat the other week nailed me.  I was nauseated and dizzy. Typical motion sickness! I had to remedy the situation since I knew I had 2 more hours to go until I reached port. Cause There are multiple sensory systems that register movements including inner ears and eyes. Also included is something called proprioceptive input which is the sensory feedback in your joints that tell you where your body is in space. When the senses send mixed messages to the brain the body's reaction is that ill feeling. An example is a rocking boat not not registering in...
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Creating a Perfect Cup of Coffee

Creating a Perfect Cup of Coffee

It's the process that creates a perfect cup of coffee...the aroma, color, shape, sounds and the movement and the location of where the coffee beans are stored or the drive to the cafe. It's all sensory data that is registered in your brain. RadioLab airs how the brain interprets this by using the metaphor music.  The entire broadcast is worth the hour listen, but if your short on time skip forty-four minutes into RadioLabs play-by-play of creating a cup of coffee within the sensory interpretation. Coffee-lovers are stimulated when they hear the word coffee.  Nutritionally, its a completely different playing field. My focus here isn't on how coffee nourishes but to begin a conversation about the effect of creating a cup (or four) may be equally gratifying without drinking it.  Some may need to cut back on coffee or eliminate it for health reasons. There are ways to maintain what coffee provides without drinking it. If you're a coffee lover how do you splurge...
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Three Steps To Skyrocket Happiness When the Forbidden Brings Tension

Three Steps To Skyrocket Happiness When the Forbidden Brings Tension

Sharing space with certain 'others' (you know who) may provoke alarm. Three steps to skyrocket the 'happy' feelings in the midst of forbidden or tense relationship moments are: listen, sense, share. Active listening is a full body skill. Clear the mind, look at the speaker, posture the body in a receiving gesture. Observe the body's sensory responses. Which sense is reacting most to this experience? What are the internal distractions? What are the external distractions? Sharing formulates conclusions towards happy feelings by sifting the objective from the subjective. Write, draw or share with someone the details about impressionable moments. Then go back to the first threatening source with what you learned from listening and observing the full experience. These simple, yet powerful actions keep the happiness door open into relationships bound towards maturity. Ongoing communication within and with others defeats cowardly reactions and fills the happiness jackpot. Below are stories shared by two very different women. Each story embraces the humble, often challenging desire to act within a...
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Food Can Be A Trigger

Food Can Be A Trigger

It is that season when there is always something baking in the oven or a tea kettle boiling for tea or cocoa. Family mealtimes are emphasized and social gatherings are regularly scheduled. The work offices are stocked up with cookies or treats in shining, foil wrappers. Holiday treats and celebrations bring a sense of community, nurture our bodies and feed our soul. But what about those who have difficulties or disordered eating habits? The increase in food can be a trigger or stir up anxieties. Recently, I found out a person very close to me was having such difficulties.  She reported always having such emotional pain followed by physical pain of overeating and then ultimately this effected her self-worth.  This was difficult to discuss and shows bravery on her part. Nonetheless, timing was difficult - all of this surfaced right before the holidays. It is important to me to be mindful of her situation.  I know we will only have a short time...
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What Is The Culprit to Behaviors You Want To Stop?

What Is The Culprit to Behaviors You Want To Stop?

History is an incredible occurrence that shapes everything to stand with remarkable uniqueness. How often do you stop to consider something or someone's history? An example of a 'something' are words. Vocabulary history is acquired through selective listening and reading or engrained through cultural norms. The history of common words - like connection, originated with different spelling (connectere) then morph from their homeland (Latin - connexio) into new cultures (English - connect). In consideration of the history of 'someone' a form of history measurement may be through behaviors. Behavior responses may change as demonstrated by designs preferred, the slang spoken, the people or cultures valued for purposeful sharing. Behaviors lead to daily choices and then return as life history. The history of brain growth shares commonalities with the life of the 'something' and 'someone' in this world. Within the brain is the amygdala. It acts to connect feelings and behaviors by tracing mental history for a patterned response. For example, today's scent of pot-roast may continuously bring happiness because...
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What Is Sensory Regulation?

What Is Sensory Regulation?

What is sensory regulation and why is health and design related to it?  Design thinking through a health lens improves sensory knowledge and design sensibility. Think of those drinking excessive amounts of coffee or caffeinated beverages.  Or those with unusual sleeping habits. Perhaps, extreme energy levels - all time high or extreme lows. These examples touch on a lengthy list of symptoms that signals warning. The brain's response to sensations seeks its idea of appropriate and efficient. This may not agree with societal or desired standards. Sensory regulation is the way the brain and nervous system manages sensations. These sensations return as behaviors. Our sense reaction triggers the nervous system to sends millions of recorded and encoded messages to the brain, Touch, smell, taste, vision, hearing, vestibular, proprioceptive, interoceptive systems - each are interpreted with a response outcome. This regulates our state of arousal. Our body determines the source, degree and significance of input.  One impact is our physical ability to navigate. Now,...
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Everyday Functioning For Kids and Adults With Sensory Concerns

Everyday Functioning For Kids and Adults With Sensory Concerns

Life is constantly changing around us.  Things like the temperature, lighting, and noises are always being processed.  Although a lot of this happens on an autonomic level, for persons with sensory processing concerns, standing still can be overwhelming and effect everyday function. Occupational therapist Catherine Armani-Munn, MS OTR/L explores the challenges of everyday functioning for kids and adults with sensory concerns. Bethany: What year & where did you graduate? Catherine: I graduated from Keuka College in a 5 yr masters program.  My undergrad was in Occupational Science and in 2010 I graduated with my masters in Occupational Therapy. I also got a minor in ASL (American Sign Language) in college which has helped me a lot in the field, especially working with the autism population. Bethany: What is  your background and what areas do you specialize in? Catherine: I have worked for several different school districts specializing with children with autism. I have also worked in preschools for the deaf and hard of hearing where I communicated...
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