How Stress Spreads and Methods To Avoid It

How Stress Spreads and Methods To Avoid It

HR Academy, Social
Two employees walk into the office one regularly-scheduled work day morning. They respectfully go their separate desks, set down their belongings but cling to the unnerving chaos experienced moments before work. Mental disorders from unmanaged stress are climbing far above heart conditions, cancer, and diabetes. Everyone experiences stress.  Shared similar interests creates a community. Current points of tension to managing stress include: how people manage stress; just who is responsible to managing it; and, health knowledge about why it's valuable to manage stress   Below are two cases of three people. Each reveal how stress is contagious and methods to stop it from spreading. Sensations to Stress Alan's brain interprets the sound and sight of Joe eating tortilla chips as an annoyance. Sally isn't phased by Joe's eating habits. When Alan is sitting one…
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Wellbeing Knowledge-sharing Improves Employee Engagement

Wellbeing Knowledge-sharing Improves Employee Engagement

Emotional, HR Academy
Shaming peers squander their ability to thrive. Fear is a common feeling that is shamed. A workplace culture supporting feelings like fear embrace employee wellbeing . This action endorses the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and Americans with Disabilities Act. Addressing how employee's problem-solve at work initiates an improvement to how they solve performance behavior issues. According to existing research a culture that invests in health and wellbeing knowledge-sharing improves employee engagement. Professionals trained in employee performance expedites performance outcomes. Workplace environment factors are also factors to performance according to the Well Living Lab. Fear exists due to internal and external factors. Professionals that apply person, task, and environment services address all factors to debilitating feelings that risk mental health. Todd Kashdan identifies emotional variables are also linked to surroundings in Why We Need More Science and Less…
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Work Performance Satisfaction Directly Correlates with Sensitivities

Work Performance Satisfaction Directly Correlates with Sensitivities

HR Academy, Workplace
It's difficult to convey an important message or inquiry with someone who doesn't speak the same language, as James McAvoy demonstrates. Sensations are similar to languages. Sight, sound, odor, body movement, taste, body exertion, touch, and instinct each speak and respond to specific details within surroundings. Sensation communicates then body responds. When laying with a book sleepiness occurs. The aroma of coffee activates saliva glands. Steady running to breathing rhythm encourages confidence. Each body has a unique inner-dialogue. Sense and perception interdependently create body responses. In the foreign language example one scenario will provide different sensations and perceptions because of bias in interpretation. People conclude knowledge on the basis of their sensory interpretation. Some become averse to certain 'normal' sensations because there is a sensation barrier as the mind processes…
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Variable Employee Performance Resources Overcome Top 5 Workplace Issues

Variable Employee Performance Resources Overcome Top 5 Workplace Issues

HR Academy, Workplace
Typically when someone experiences the novel verses the norm of every day life it is articulated as something everyone needs to try. This might be a fresh approach to organizing or the empowerment from an app. Yet, swapping something new for something old isn't a guarantee of the same gratification for everyone. Resources undoubtedly vary in cause and effect. This recent report of 487 employers and over 5,000 employee responses identified their top health and productivity concerns. Employers pointed at technology and organizational issues, yet employees disagreed. Their concerns were of personal work experiences. EMPLOYEES TOP 5 Inadequate Staffing Low Pay Corporate Culture Unclear/Conflicting Job Expectations Excessive Amount of Organizational Changes EMPLOYERS TOP 5 Lack of Work/Life Balance (excessive workloads and/or long hours) Inadequate Staffing Technologies that Expand Availability During Non-working…
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Employee, Task, Environment Satisfaction For Best Performance

Employee, Task, Environment Satisfaction For Best Performance

HR Academy, Workplace
The fabric of performance outcomes is interdependent on employee, task, and environment. Quality performance is the result of an environment supporting employees engaged in roles that are meaningful to them through work tasks that satisfy both their and the employer mission. PERSON There are two overarching roles in the workplace: the leader and the employee. Gallup's How Millenials Want To Work And Live shared the "Big Six" changes workplace leadership needs to make. The adjustment is from an 'old will' culture to one with a 'new will'. [caption id="attachment_6359" align="alignright" width="700"] Graph from Gallup abridged .pdf version, How Millennials Want to Work and Live[/caption]   The 'new will' or future culture is one that meets contextual factors, including customs, beliefs, activity patterns, and behavior standards. Additionally, expectations is a factor that involves being…
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Three Themes of Spirituality Effect Performance As Revealed In Research

Three Themes of Spirituality Effect Performance As Revealed In Research

HR Academy, Spiritual
Performance is effected by the unavoidable and planned major life events. A two year study of 2,106 people identified the birth of a first child caused the most significant impact on wellbeing. The events following included divorce, unemployment, and death of a spouse. Chronic stress is reported to effect the immune system and ultimately a person's quality of life. Major life events challenge the ability to be resilient, grounded, and self-aware. Suicide is so common amongst Japanese and Korean employees that it's listed as a work-related condition for compensation. Spirituality is a performance behavior because it intersects life meaning and the ability to engage in activities. Researchers who searched the term and methodology of spirituality revealed three themes: avenues, experience, and meaning.   AVENUES TO AND THROUGH SPIRITUALITY This theme includes coping through…
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What to Do To Prevent or Address Pain or Numbness From Work Tasks

What to Do To Prevent or Address Pain or Numbness From Work Tasks

HR Academy, Intellectual
Severe future health issues may occur if there pain or numbness is presently ignored in the hand, arm, leg or foot. Temporary pain remedies may cause transference of the core issue. Listed below are three safe remedies to stop persisting pain. Seek multiple opinions with an interdisciplinary team. A variety of specialized professionals provide alternative perspectives that may be missed with one. The value of a team approach reduces error. A team may include a chiropractor, occupational therapist, ergonomist, physical therapist, doctor, and massage therapist. Seek referrals and weigh out opinions with a trusted source. Personally log daily activities and behaviors over a 3 to 6 weeks.  Record keeping assists to manage budget and time. Awareness of body responses through attention to cause and effect may reduce costly appointments, medications, and products…
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Performance Behaviors and Strategies For Pain and Stress from Trauma

Performance Behaviors and Strategies For Pain and Stress from Trauma

HR Academy, Spiritual
It is often suggested to avoid discussions about spirituality, yet this behavior offers numerous performance resources. Medical professionals openly ask questions about spiritual behaviors to energize performance outcomes. Pain, stress, and trauma effect mental and physical health.  Jay Mahler is the founder of The California Mental Health and Spirituality Initiative. His purview of spiritual performance is "the experience of 'madness' can include a profound experience of connection and spirituality; oneness with nature; and the meaning and purpose of life," A few of the most common questions that revolve around spiritual behaviors include: "Why me?" "Have I done something wrong to cause this to happen to me?" "Can I still rely on myself?" "What will the future hold for me?" Fear's most common outcomes are withdrawal and ignorance. The University of Cambridge argue spiritual…
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Six Case Studies Where Sensations Became Mind Fuel

Six Case Studies Where Sensations Became Mind Fuel

HR Academy, Workplace
Behavior results from being distracted and distressed have been researched since the 1960's. Science's primary focus is on the central nervous system's response to sensations. Results identify that performance behaviors failing to modify sensory intake sufficiently create perceptual instability. Performance abilities reducing or eliminating distractions and distress are demonstrated by employees with a healthy mind and body. According to 2012 Aflac Workforces Report of 6,100 United States workers, those receiving health and wellbeing services report higher level of job satisfaction, feel happier with their employer, and are more satisfied with their overall benefits. 55% of millennials believe a healthy mind leads to a healthy body. Sensations are mind fuel. Stimuli enters the body as information. The processed result is behavior. Hypersensitivity, hyposensitivity or magnasensitivity are 'disturbances of sensory modulation and/or information processing'. An intervention…
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These Three Fuels Improve Performance Abilities

These Three Fuels Improve Performance Abilities

HR Academy, Physical
It's the start of one of those Monday's that requires concerted effort to do things. There's the smell of coffee lingering mixed with the aroma of fresh bagels beside the buffet of several cream cheeses. Noise levels heighten as peers huddle to collaborate. The smartphone chimes with each email and text message. Recently we did an experiment with octane types used to fuel an SUV. Every vehicle manufacturer identifies what octane is optimal for vehicle performance. The SUV's manufacturer recommended 91 octane. With 89 Octane the fuel burned faster then what 93 provided. The recommended premium octane proved to save in gas efficiency at four more miles per gallon. Certain body fuels have greater performance efficiency. Our body fuels on fiber, protein, fat, physical activity, and sleep but it also…
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Three Ways to Identify Performance Literacy

Three Ways to Identify Performance Literacy

Emotional, HR Academy
Those creeping internal sensations of doing too much of something begs for occupational literacy. Occupational therapist Elizabeth Townsend defines it as "a source of language and skills for persons at any age to adapt to diverse contexts and purposes." Internal sensations may be difficult to identify with words. Feelings are often confused with a need. For example, suppression by activity consumption including shopping, food or alcohol intake. Silencing truth is another example by way of gossiping, lying, or holding unrealistic perspectives. This Globis 2013 survey identified how 200 leaders lacked language and skills by avoiding necessary conversations by an alarming 97%. Leaders believed they might cause employee stress. 80% believed angry behaviors were a necessary part of their role with "difficult conversations." Occupational justice commits rights, responsibilities, and liberties for quality performance…
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How to Listen and Respond With Awareness to State of Health

How to Listen and Respond With Awareness to State of Health

HR Academy, Social
One common source of stress is not being heard. This takes form in many ways with similar outcomes including a blow to morale. Below are performance strategies following the biological breakdown of how to respond when it appears no one is listening. The Iceberg Effect is a metaphor to the state of health. There is typically a slight view to one's perceived state of health.The motivational level is secluded to peers who dwell or are invited to be a part of that health aspect.The meaning realm is the soul. It's the most intimate interpersonal relationship between health, body, and mind. Active listening is a learned skill. State of health improves with active listening. Behavior responses resolve the degree of difficulty to becoming an active listener. Responses when no one is listening reveals…
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Three Elements Directly Effecting Absenteeism and Presenteeism

Three Elements Directly Effecting Absenteeism and Presenteeism

HR Academy, Workplace
Each workplace has cultural norms including expectations and commonalities. One example is in certain seasons or holidays productivity slows. Managers might reduce work expectations because they anticipate employee's performance to change. Productive employees anticipate performance changes because they are skilled managers of their behaviors. Performance is interdependent on six behaviors: physical, occupational, intellectual, spiritual, social, and emotional aspects. When behavior management is performance outcomes weaken through presenteeism and absenteeism. Presenteeism The result of an employee showing up to work despite a condition like illness, injury, or anxiety is loss in productivity, workplace epidemics, poor health management, and exhaustion. A cultural norm of open and frequent manager-employee dialogue will reduce presenteeism's effect on productivity. In 2003 the total cost of presenteeism in the US was $150 billion per year. Pain and depression are…
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Performance Improves By Sound, Taste, and Visual Responses

Performance Improves By Sound, Taste, and Visual Responses

HR Academy, Intellectual
Science has been slowly revealing how to retrain the brain. Day-to-day there are moments when something isn't so pleasant. Consistent moodiness may trigger with an overly optimistic peer. Frequent disruptions are common with high-traffic noise in the walkway. A foggy brain after lunch disengages attention to detail. Cognitive science is linking biological responses like those listed above with cultural experiences. Performance improves by changing daily experiences. Sound, taste, and visual responses are three biological initiatives for retraining the brain. Here Is What You Hear A new part of the brain was revealed through auditory testing. Scientists confirms the brain has neuroplasticity. This means the brain is capable to change patterns with thinking, feeling, and behaving. According to most recent research frequency-following responses is one way to improve  audible sensitivities and…
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What Resources Act Like If They Were Your Employee

What Resources Act Like If They Were Your Employee

HR Academy, Occupational
The short stories in Rich Dad Poor Dad by Robert Kiyosaki instantly empowers. Kiyosaki continuously reminds readers to "mind your own business" with the metaphor that dollar bills are an employee. They work for performance outcome. This helped me to appreciate that all the personal resources we choose are literally our employees. The form and function of furnishings we use work for us to accomplish sleeping, sitting, and eating. Every object we own provides an outcome including ease of usability, longevity of wear-and-tear, storability, and ownership advantages. Words are our employees. Thoughts expressed are resources providing returns we hope to anticipate. Destructive words have outcomes. Supportive words have outcomes. Expressed words are employees investing in value-creation while thoughts are like employees looking for work. Communities we use become employees accomplishing or hindering goals. Classrooms, work-spaces,…
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What Few Know About Their Ravenous Behaviors

What Few Know About Their Ravenous Behaviors

HR Academy, Physical
Do you have an insatiable drive for enhancing experiences? Magnasensitive individuals desire the excitable - blinking lights, rollercoasters, or a lifestyle like being an entrepreneur or overextended work loads. Adversely, there's also the need to continuously be engaged. This magical central nervous system response may also bring distress. For sanity sake a body needs rest! The superior advantage of the central nervous system is it triggers behaviors that appear as natural cravings. An example of a craving is body exertion through movement. Pushing, pulling, jumping...these joint and muscle forces apply pressure on the nerve endings for the return of nervous relief. The body craves rest to. Leisure activities slow thinking and moving exertion which benefits heart, mental and joint health. Forced exertion examples within a task include over-applied pressure when writing or walking.…
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Workplace Abuse and The Most Effective Way To Explode It

Workplace Abuse and The Most Effective Way To Explode It

HR Academy, Workplace
The workplace seeks to build and fulfill marketplace relationships. It secures revenue. Workplace cultures resemble the character of the founder. A leader with courage, vision, discipline, and endurance breath cultural standards into the employees of a business. Oh, and one more trait…love. Love may appear taboo as a leadership trait. When considering the characteristic of love it repeatedly sets a cultural tone. Loving relationships extend and reciprocate support. In a corporate culture it drives out adversity between employee, customer, and workplace mission. Unfavorable scandalous leadership behaviors provoke tragedies that are costly. Employee's disrespect deadlines, quit, and   become victims to customers. Over time these behaviors become cultural norms all employees follow. We follow leaders. Norms define stability in the quest for revenue security. A study reported abuse was present in 79% of…
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Agonizing Meetings Could Be Due to Presence Disparity

Agonizing Meetings Could Be Due to Presence Disparity

HR Academy, Workplace
Finished projects bring moments of exhilaration for all involved. Those involved that were engaged empowered the productivity of the project. When all employees on a team are present by actively listening, creating, and collaborating there is consistently powerful, innovative outcomes that increase revenue. The alternative is a phenomenon identified as presence disparity, which compromises innovative workflow and timely productivity. Presence disparity is when telecommuters physically experience a compromising difference when virtually collaborating. Missing verbal and visual content due to background noises or poor quality live stream video strains the body. This mentally, physically, and emotionally taxing effect loses productive opportunities. Collaborative moments lose empowered creativity and revenue-building strategies. Full engagement requires all senses prepared to mentally interpret content. Presence Disparity is a macro-sensory productivity issue. High-quality video is one solution to improving engagement…
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A Seamstress Exhibiting Stress In The Workplace

A Seamstress Exhibiting Stress In The Workplace

HR Academy, Workplace
GIG Design's team discussed observations of a seamstress exhibiting stress in the workplace. Observations of the work environment included details of the lighting, noise, temperature, and peer engagement. The work space is an open area of approximately thirty seamstresses, all sitting at a sewing station actively engaging in production of a product. Observations of the seamstress were noted to be signs of distress as exhibited by facial expressions, frequent posturing with head tilted into hand through elbow support, uncharacteristic pauses of production. Following a lifestyle profile and sensory assessment she identified as under-responsive to sensations. Hyposensitivities This form of regulating the nervous system is categorized by muted, delayed responses, and low sensory registration. This individual passively regulates their nervous system, has a high threshold to sensory stimuli, and passively reacts to sensations.…
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Is Your Employer Providing Sick Care or Health Care?

Is Your Employer Providing Sick Care or Health Care?

HR Academy, Workplace
There is a jolting difference in cultural motivation on 'sick care' and 'health care'. Sick care is reactionary, providing individuals support with onset of an injury, health or mental conditions. Sick care recipients pay for medical bills instead of luxuries. Their employers pay for loss of production or new hire training. Health care recipients pay for health resources that reduce the onset of uncommunicable diseases, depression, injury. Their employers pay out bonuses and employee rewards due to improved profit. Is your employer providing sick care or health care? Move health care awareness from knowledge to action. Sharing stories on health movement builds the belief its possible. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation shared several stories of national communities that acted on health care. It's understood raw data in percentages or dollar signs build…
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20 Questions For Sleep Awareness

20 Questions For Sleep Awareness

HR Academy, Physical
In response to the statement "employers can educate shift workers about how to improve sleep" in the NBC Health's reveal we aren't getting enough sleep, here are 20 questions to get started. Answers are provided at the end. How many hours of sleep per night do you suspect the average American gets during the week? How do you think this ranked with the other countries: Japan, UK, Germany, Canada, Mexico? How about on the weekend: U.S., Japan, U.K., Germany, Canada, Mexico? Questionnaire respondents were asked: How much sleep do you need to function best? What do you suspect they answered: U.S., Japan, U.K., Germany, Canada, Mexico? What do you think differences existed amongst different countries? How does culture effect sleep? How many hours of sleep are recommended for adults ages 18-64? How about older adults…
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30 Details On Health Costs

30 Details On Health Costs

HR Academy, Workplace
Health Benefits manager Lisa Mrozinski at Robert W. Baird & Company said, “You may think you’re really healthy, but until you go through the process we can provide, you may not be aware that you’re pre-diabetic or have high cholesterol.” This quote was cited in the book The Grassroots Health Care Revolution by John Torinus Jr. Is there a process in place to learning the genuine health of your company? Here are 30 details on health costs John shared through his book to remind us of the integrity of providing health improvement services: United States of America health costs are 2x per capita of anywhere else in the world. Increased national health care costs then reduced money spent for education, research & development, public safety, environmental improvement, defense, personal finances, and wage…
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Practice B.E.I.N.G. to Achieve Workplace Prosperity and Safety

Practice B.E.I.N.G. to Achieve Workplace Prosperity and Safety

HR Academy, Occupational
Prosperity and safety in the workplace are necessary for best performance outcomes. Prosperity breathes comfort that survival is possible for driving competitive advantages and teamwork capabilities. It reduces presenteeism. Safe practices reduce absences and turnover. Productivity results from workplaces filled with attitudes of prosperity and safety. Employees instinctually seek feeling safe but stretching outside of comfortable practices may compromise quality of life. Experiences of prosperity through novel practices offers the ability to be vulnerable towards what appears as ambiguous. The anonymous quote, "If you're comfortable in life then you're not maturing," is true. Maturing performance standards results in employee discomfort. A workplace may reduce discomfort with B.E.I.N.G strategies resulting in employee's boldly existing in necessary growth. B.E.I.N.G. To Boldly Existing in Necessary Growth is the ability to successfully manage the…
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Bedtime Strategies for 3 Different Sleep Issues

Bedtime Strategies for 3 Different Sleep Issues

HR Academy, Physical
Sleep hygiene a significant contributor to performance behaviors. Achieving optimal hygiene requires effort and perseverance. To illustrate how one might achieve sleep below are three stories about three different characters struggling with sleep: C. Want, C. Fear, and C. Loathe. “I want to sleep more.”  C. Want follows trends. Routines include variations of: caffeine to wake or to keep aroused, sugar for quick surges of energy, social media avenues to distract feelings, and typically saying ‘yes’ to everything. The body works naturally by following a biological clock that organizes by daylight patterns. Want an energetic rhythm. Set up necessary sleep hygiene for daytime napping and body-inspired bedtime cues. “I fear over-sleeping.” C. Fear delays going to bed. Routines include variations of: denying fatigue during evening hours, working more after dinner, laying in…
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How To Improve Confidence by Estimating Time Accurately

How To Improve Confidence by Estimating Time Accurately

HR Academy, Occupational
With setting goals a timeline and deadline is created. Estimating time accurately is a skill that begins with childhood activities including board games and getting ready for school. It may improve or weaken depending on the practice how frequently it's practiced. Skills improve with practice. The ability to make accurate estimates is closely tied to the ability to understand and solve problems. Learning to approximate activity lengths prepares for future goal setting. Poor time estimation weakens confidence because short and long-term goals are repeatedly missed. The mind processes stories with better recall then it does with time estimation. Estimating measurements is most often a mathematical skill, which improves with practice. Illusions often stand in the way. Stories may offer an illusion of time that exaggerates the effect of changing circumstances on future performance.…
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What to Do With That Busy Mind That Disrupts Performance

What to Do With That Busy Mind That Disrupts Performance

HR Academy, Intellectual
Awareness determines how time is spent. Behaviors are a reflection of brain activity. Psychologist Daniel Kahneman researched this phenomenon and summarized that  "even in the absence of time pressure, maintaining a coherent train of thought requires discipline." How does the brain get disciplined? Changing a busy brain with rampant, scattered thoughts towards attending to immediate surroundings, internal cues, and relational patterns is effortful work. Awareness improves intellectual behaviors. In his book Thinking Fast and Slow, Kahneman continues, "People who are cognitively busy are also more likely to make selfish choices, use sexist language, and make superficial judgments in social situations." Each of these indicate an inner-dialogue that excludes a mature sense of automatic behaviors and the act of regulating them. Awareness of natural and built environment factors, as well as body capacities…
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Why Alone Time May Improve Performance Outcomes

Why Alone Time May Improve Performance Outcomes

HR Academy, Spiritual
The word "alone" can mean different things. For instance, the single business, self-employed person may work alone. Going through a morning routine, doing a crossword puzzle, or cleaning the house are all activities that may be done during alone time. Often employees would be ecstatic to have alone time in place of work time around numerous or sometimes one person. However, there are other moments when being alone can be uncomfortable or down right scary. Being alone triggers spirit-based behaviors. Performance relies on the spirit of an individual. At GIG Design spiritual behavior is one part of design sensibility. It establishes actionable behaviors within purpose-seeking and existence. Examples of spiritual behaviors are hope, resiliency, and value-based support for discovering and acting on ways to thrive. Spirituality empowers meaningfulness within performance.…
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Master Stress-management With A Multi-Dimensional Approach

Master Stress-management With A Multi-Dimensional Approach

HR Academy, Physical
  When walking stairs the body needs to balance on one foot in order to lift the other in motion upward or downward. Eventually both feet land on one surface. Learning how to master taking a step is multi-dimensional. It requires physical, intellectual, and emotional performance. Mastering managing stress is multi-dimensional. The following story illustrates two different reactions to stress: One adult recalled that her father was a friendly, loud, active man who loved to play with her in a very active way when she was small, picking her up and tossing her in the air. Unfortunately, this woman was severely gravitationally insecure, so every time he did this she was terrified, and she hated having him come near her as she did not know when she would be tossed about.…
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How Light Can Improve Sleep and Overall Health

How Light Can Improve Sleep and Overall Health

HR Academy, Occupational
Light may lull the troubled sleeper right to sleep! Prior to the discovery of electricity, light from the sun controlled sleep-wake cycles.  Artificial light disrupts this natural rhythm, not only in our external environment but also inside our bodies. Questions to Ask: Are you aware of outdoor lighting conditions? What effect does indoor lighting have on you? Do you feel sleepy when it gets dark outside? What time do you shut off electronic screens (TV, phone, computer)? The Circadian System Our circadian system controls the processes within our body that follow a 24-hour cycle: hormone regulation, body temperature, and sleep/wake cycles. How Light Affects the Circadian System A collection of cells called the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) send signals throughout our body to help regulate us to our 24-hour day. Light travels…
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What Distorted Thinking Is and How To Stop It

What Distorted Thinking Is and How To Stop It

Emotional, HR Academy
In the past there were few classrooms or households teaching exactly what a healthy relationship is. Parents may model valuable aspects but don't physically sit down with their children as teachers of Relationships 101. A healthy relationship from 'the inside out' identifies what communication can become. Healthy relationships begin with an honest self assessment. It requires being prepared for a life-long journey of education. It is effortful work, time and awareness to identify then replace distorted information that the mind believes as truth. There are many layers to replacing distorted thinking. Author and professor Benjamin K. Bergen explains in Louder than Words that we simulate experiences, actions and performances in our mind through a scientifically proven process called embodied simulation. "Meaning, according to the embodied simulation hypothesis, isn’t just abstract mental symbols; it’s…
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One Simple Step to Get Your Sleep

One Simple Step to Get Your Sleep

HR Academy, Physical
Of course it is best to get those seven to eight hours of sleep in for the next day to run smoothly. The tricky part in achieving this is to pull away from that to-do list or mindless moments prior to bed time. To activate change the brain needs an inter-connection across the non-conscious and conscious domains (Charlesworth and Morton 2015). The body clock is one way to achieve sleep. Chronobiologists identified we have two types of body clocks. One reason getting to bed may be difficult is because your personal clock is socially directed toward your body's opposite needs (Keller and Smith 2014). This means practicing self-control when it comes to your attention and effort. To say, "I'm getting to bed early tonight," is a start, yet self-control requires physical methods to make a set bedtime…
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Five Questions to Identify Which Stress Condition Is at Risk

Five Questions to Identify Which Stress Condition Is at Risk

HR Academy, Occupational
One-fourth of all employees view their job as the number one stress in their lives. ¹  Yale University found that twenty-six percent workers report they are "often or very often burned out or stressed by their work. ² Health care expenditures are nearly fifty percent greater for workers who report high levels of stress. ³ The National Institute of Occupational Science and Health state that job stress is: the harmful physical and emotional responses that occur when the requirements of the job do not match the capabilities, resources or needs of the worker. Identifying the varied signs of job stress are what occupational therapy practitioners are skilled at. Stress is rarely seen as serious by both employees and employers. It's become a societal norm that people simply refer to their day as 'so busy'.…
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How to Improve Teamwork with Storytelling

How to Improve Teamwork with Storytelling

HR Academy, Occupational
Storytelling is a Design Sensibility tool. Design-thinking includes openly sharing experiences on paper or with people for added dimension to problem-solving. The stories we tell our self may be novel or familiar to peers. Sharing perceptions of the way a problem appears or was experienced offers a connection that is unique between the story teller and the listener. Engage in teamwork by communicating personalized details. Long-term improvements to mood and health improve (Pennebaker, 1997) when vulnerability forms. Articulated words shape into octaves, fragrances, or whatever sensation the storyteller conveys. Action inherently designs a storyteller's surroundings (Epstein et. al 2014). Overcoming trauma creates stories of heroism. There are numerous words unspoken and stories bound to bones by clinging to fear of sharing. Aging is the framework to un-silencing believable forms words create. Active…
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How Design Sensibility Impacts Performance Outcomes

How Design Sensibility Impacts Performance Outcomes

HR Academy, Spiritual
Dancing without music may appear as silly or odd. Dancing needs guided rhythm and music ignites an internal rhythm that may be expressed with movement. Design Sensibility unites mediums with sensations for best performance. The ability to improve performance through responses to sensations, complex emotional or aesthetic influences through the use of context, occupation and sense factors is design sensibility. Performance barriers may exist and misguide behavior responses including attention or situational discernment. Design sensibility offers the ability to detect an issue, identify an issue, then solve the issue. When athletes strengthen skill they first recognize their weakness. Scientists identify that when performance focused attention is externally rather than internally then performance is enhanced. If a sprinter's speed weakness then with design sensibility they may ignite a mindset to 'imagine…
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Sharpening Abilities and Skills

Sharpening Abilities and Skills

HR Academy, Spiritual
Stories of heroism often begins with a disadvantaged person who appears to be approaching an unthinkable or uncontrollable situation.  The characters in those stories typically overcome the obstacles to achieving that thing they are seeking. What is one situation you feel is a disadvantage? Change is inevitable. So, let the air out of your tires to move under that bridge that appears as an obstacle to getting to the other side. Use your number one strength to overcome the following obstacles: You have arthritis in your fingers, knees, and neck. A natural disaster destroyed everything you own. The person you trust the most confessed they abused a child. Questions to Ask: How did your ability prevail in each these scenarios? What motivates you to move forward through what appears as…
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How to Respectfully Unmask Genuine Feelings in the Workplace

How to Respectfully Unmask Genuine Feelings in the Workplace

Emotional, HR Academy
Genuine feelings are often masked. This typically occurs when the perceived mood, time or environment may increase stress if honest feedback is shared verses being agreeable. Mood is subjective. When gauging the mood of an individual there's great opportunity of being completely wrong. With practice, time, and awareness to emotional responses there may be a brief, yet genuine exchange in sharing feelings. Skilled active listeners and emotionally healthy individuals are capable of detecting falsehoods in emotional responses. Sensory sensitive human beings are roughly 20% of the population (Acevedo 2014). A human's sense is fascinating. Those who have a difficult time trusting intuitive messages may read facial expressions or follow voice tone inflection to perceive one's mood. Active listeners may identify complexities rise when a genuine mood is masked due to perceived…
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How to Blend Personal and Work Roles

How to Blend Personal and Work Roles

HR Academy, Social
Are you in the right role? Role models are excellent resources to setting measurable standards. They help identify the set of skills and experiences necessary for a specific role. Identify the roles in the following story. Which shared similar skills as the king? There is a story of a king who went to his garden one morning, only to find everything withered and dying. He asked the oak tree that stood near the gate what the trouble was.  The oak said it was tired of life and determined to die because it was not tall and beautiful like the pine tree. The pine was troubled because it could not bear grapes like the grapevine. The grapevine was determined to throw its life away because it could not stand erect and produce…
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Being Tolerable When the Unexpected Keeps Occurring

Being Tolerable When the Unexpected Keeps Occurring

HR Academy, WholeBe Toolkit
Tolerance is more frequently used as a stepping stone for social issues. It initiates a conversation about change. Awareness of differences, integration, and celebration of these differences are all aspects of being tolerable. It can be a bad email, or a peer with an opposing viewpoint. Sometimes an extra task to support a sick colleague is the case. Often these are examples of being tolerable. But does it end there? Performing day-in-day-out tasks are often part of a day's plan. There was time for forethought and scheduling around and for these tasks. Adding tolerating nuances will use extra energy originally reserved for what was planned. An added deadline might be the final straw to emotionally snapping. Questions to Ask: What does tolerance look like in your workplace? What appears to repeatedly…
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Performance Growth Once Boredom Is Detected

Performance Growth Once Boredom Is Detected

HR Academy, Intellectual
Boredom is an experience many people avoid. This clinician researched "doing, being and boredom" in 1,500 young subjects. His summary: they were bored 42% of the time with only 10% of their time being spent doing 'productive' work. The difference appeared to be how the recipients used their time: passive leisure self-care education, and labor force. In the Lego Movie the characters created an activity because they became bored in their relationships. Angry Dad hated his son's creativity. It interred with Dad's idea of play. At the end of the movie Dad identified his idea of being playful was a still scene of perfection. The son's idea of play was doing play. Once Dad understood the difference between their play perspectives his compassion moved them from a relationship that idolized boredom to one that appreciated…
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If Seeking Greater EQ Then Improve Self-Awareness

If Seeking Greater EQ Then Improve Self-Awareness

HR Academy, Spiritual
Dr. Steven Aung and Dr. Badri Rickhi are positioning mental health and spiritual wellbeing as a mind/body necessity. There are three recommendations they encourage for achieving improved performance: stress reduction programs, adapting the body to nature, and being aware of the senses. Rationale and emotions steer behavior reactions. A "window of tolerance" is what Dr. Bessel van der Kolk identifies as that short moment between being stimulated - feeling and rationalizing - to behaving a certain way. When the body is hyper-aroused then the brain disengages from that short moment of time. Neuroscience identifies self-awareness as the most effective way to build EQ. Silence or music engages self-awareness. Soulfulness engages neurological links that direct the mind into harmonic patterns. We process sounds in the same region of the brain that we process behavior change. Harmony…
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Overcome Anger, Fear, and Stress One Surprise at a Time

Overcome Anger, Fear, and Stress One Surprise at a Time

HR Academy, Occupational
Daniel Kahneman, author of Thinking Fast and Slow says, "You are more likely to learn something by finding surprises in your own behavior than by hearing surprising facts about people in general". Anger, fear, stress, or anxiety following a surprise affects every body organ as well as those in the surroundings (Siegal and Bergman, 2006). Surprises may bring out behaviors seeded from the inner 3 year-old.  Some surprises may lead to anger once the results are factored into a time line.  Therefore, it may require motivation to continuously observe performance behaviors. Yet, once in pursuit of the surprise a student to behavior change is born. Questions to Ask: How well do you adapt to surprises? What is a common reaction to a surprise resulting in excessive time to resolve a result? What…
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How to Use Patterned Play To Overcome Adversity

How to Use Patterned Play To Overcome Adversity

HR Academy, Intellectual
Sometimes I find it strange when I'm surrounded by quiet people.  It seems that I am surrounded by "noisy brains". Of course, I need to quiet my head-talk to get to that thought. One comforting idea is, what if everyone replaced listening to their head-talk by watching a picture-reel. Imagine their words becoming images. We often mistake 'play' as a child's activity.  However, adults play too. Patterned play begins with being imaginative. The life cycle of play is a conceptive (mental) moment arching towards nourishment and habits of the spirit, creativity, and relationships. Shame is linked to experiences of creative failure. Adults who deny feeling ashamed invest in the pattern of play. Play is also coined as abductive reasoning. Questions to Ask: Define what 'play' currently is in your workplace? Are you able to form mental pictures? What…
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How to Gain Optimal Results in Every Situation

How to Gain Optimal Results in Every Situation

HR Academy, Social
Imagine working with a colleague that opposes your political beliefs. What do you do? The larger part of social happiness isn't emotion. It's mental arithmetic. The sum of your expectations, your ideals, and your acceptance of what you can't change determines everyday habits and choices. This formula steers performance. Everyone's sum is unique. Two opposing behaviors may turn a situation into pointless discomfort. Compassion and active listening are fundamental relationship skills. Performance flourishes into empowerment by mental shifting. A flexible response to opposing political views may be to share feelings of discomfort. The time discussing politics replaces discussing work objectives or team-building while at work. Directing attention on feelings that oppose productive work relationships may offer a compassionate response. Switch the mind-set from what isn't relatable to what is. Columbia University psychologist George…
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Why Destructive Behaviors May Be Performance Supporting Tactics

Why Destructive Behaviors May Be Performance Supporting Tactics

Emotional, HR Academy
Celebrating meeting a deadline met or coping with managerial tactics arouses feelings. Sensations become acute in these and numerous other performance moments. What is heard and seen are most discussed but there is also smell, tactile, exertion, instinct, and taste sensations. The exertion of heavy feet walking through an office or facial hair petting are two sensory tactics that calm the nervous system. The comfort of a soft-foam, fabric covered chair to sit in verses a firm, swivel seat may improve one's ability to focus on research work. Alternatively, the motion of rocking and swiveling may distribute sensations for reducing anger while in an emotional overhaul. Salty or sweet tastes often and unknowingly provide hormone or body chemistry support. All these pleasure-seeking sensations are coping strategies for managing feelings that directly…
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Why Contextual Factors Improve Workplace Performance and Design

Why Contextual Factors Improve Workplace Performance and Design

HR Academy, Workplace
Contextual factors is a term rarely used in the workplace or with employee performance. It is one of three factors that categorizes performance elements for improving performance outcomes. Any feature of yourself that is not part of a health condition or health status is defined as the personal context that influences performance (WHO 2001). Our performance and design coaches facilitate improvements through the following contextual elements: Expectations of Culture, Personal Beliefs and Customs, Behavioral Standards, Demographics, Stage of Life and History, Relationship to Time, and The Non-Physical: Simulated, Real-time, and Near-time. Gender and education levels are demographics that overlap into personal beliefs and customs. Context at an organizational level includes millennial, generation X, baby boomer, retired or volunteer life stages. 'Supervisor' may be a cultural custom or expectation of rank…
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This Chemical In Your Body Increases Creativity

This Chemical In Your Body Increases Creativity

HR Academy, Physical
  Science supports the ability to further improve creativity throughout our life span. Harvard Business Review defied disciplined routines to encourage creativity as the core to doing things efficiently and effectively. Creativity will "deposit confidence in our cerebral bank accounts," according to Forbes. It's a myth a person doesn't have a creative ability. The body produces a chemical for the brain and nervous system to communicate. Serotonin regulates sleep, body temperature and libido. It also increases creativity. The production of serotonin increases when: exposed to bright light, engaged in frequent exercise, diet including chickpeas and wild seeds in place of meat proteins, and self-induced changes in mood. Questions to Ask: What resources are used to maintain efficient and effective performance in your work tasks? What is the primary way you would increase…
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Six Key Employee and Workplace Contextual Elements

Six Key Employee and Workplace Contextual Elements

HR Academy, Spiritual
There are workplaces with a culture expectation of work tracked by shift hours or a behavior standard to cover all tattoos. A workplace belief and custom may be whispering through cubicle workstations. These are examples of contextual elements in the workplace. Context is one of three performance factors used to improve performance outcomes. Contextual elements identify opportunities for education, employment and economic support as accepted by the culture in which one is a member. Context is one of three performance factors to divide performance into behavior-specific elements. The elements categorized as contextual include: expectations of culture, personal beliefs and customs, behavioral standards, demographics, stage of life and history, and relationship to time.   Occupation and sense are the additional factors to organizing performance elements. The context factor digs into workplace policy…
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One Free Performance Resource For The Active Listener

One Free Performance Resource For The Active Listener

Emotional, HR Academy
Often it is unsettling to listen to the ache in the voice of a peer sharing sorrowful or traumatic news. The pain conveyed in their dilemma may even be palpable. One effective way of coping as an active listener is meditation. The health benefits of meditation continue to flood data supporting how it is a necessary resource for developing brain function. Meditation supports emotional regulation because it functions as a brain support for coping with dilemmas including: pain tolerance, emotional control, feelings of tension, external distractions, fear of unknowns, physical issues, absenteeism, and awareness of genetic diseases. Questions to Ask: How is quiet time incorporated into the work day? What resources may support incorporating meditation into each day? Why might active listening to the mind be a support for reducing stress…
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How to Overcome Saying Yes When Desiring to Say No

How to Overcome Saying Yes When Desiring to Say No

HR Academy, Spiritual
Does your 'no' mean no? Does your 'yes' mean yes? Oh, I've been here.  In fact, I just recovered from this. When in the throws of life, action may readily happen before time allows deep thought about the implications. Rest assured, this is normal and happens to us all. Confusion may set in, but what we choose to do in the midst of it will determine the affect on all of our core aspects. Yet, this spiritual aspect is worth nestling into. Articulate 'no' as a full gestured no and yes as 100 percent yes. In the book Boundaries the authors offer nine questions to consider. Questions to Ask: Can I set limits and still be a loving person? What are legitimate boundaries? What if someone is upset or hurt by my…
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Talking to Yourself Will Develop Performance

Talking to Yourself Will Develop Performance

HR Academy, Social
First mail out those letters sitting on the table, complete the employee evaluation, and prepare for the meeting. Then think about my purpose in this job. Those thoughts became words quickly without hesitation one day. I didn’t even realize I had said them until they were muttered. Reassuring, focusing words leads to true responsiveness. Talking to yourself throughout the day is not abnormal. In fact, there is even a term that defines this phenomenon known as private speech. We often learn to do it as kids. Kids talk to themselves while playing.  It serves as an important part of their development. As we get older, it allows us to cement memories or visualize what we are thinking. Buy carrots for the soup. Oh those keys..hmmm. Private speech helps us socially. When we come up with…
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