Blame Or Matchmake? How To Improve Work Satisfaction and Performance

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The fabric of cultural awareness in the workplace may be threaded towards blame or to matchmake satisfaction with performance. This interweaving includes three things: person, task, and environment.

PERSON

There are two overarching roles in the workplace: the leader and the employee.

Gallup’s How Millenials Want To Work And Live shared the “Big Six” changes the person or people in leadership need to make. It suggests it’s time for leaders to adjust the culture from an ‘old will’ to a ‘new will’.

Graph from Gallup abridged .pdf version, How Millennials Want to Work and Live
Graph from Gallup abridged .pdf version, How Millennials Want to Work and Live

 

Culture is learned and dependent on time and place. A person’s cultural context are their customs, beliefs, activity patterns, behavior standards, and expectations accepted by the society of which the individual is a member of. Each employee brings into time and place their cultural context while thinking, doing, creating, and collaborating.

Will blaming their unique offerings produce performance?

In 2008 this study estimated that 15% of college students had sensory hypersensitivity. Today, employer leaders are managing these students. A beginner mind culture will ultimately lead employees to embrace the new, to learn. It empowers capable matchmakers. Employee’s individualistic contextual needs openly connect with time and place – what is and where is production at it’s best.

TASK

A common phrase after gym time often is, “It’s behind me – done!” That phrase basically implies the workout is something difficult to approach or a satisfactory activity. Have you heard similar phrases referencing work activities or colleagues?

Mental health is the leading concern in America’s health care system. Physical health is linked to mental health and overall performance. The way a person thinks, does, creates, and collaborates is reflective of their health. Sensory needs, otherwise known as sensory modulation (SM) significantly impacts satisfaction, health, and the ability to perform in daily routines and activities.

This study of 204 adults validated faulty information processing and cause of over-vigilance to disrupt behaviors within daily tasks. Employee’s that matchmake their sensory needs to their task are satisfied and improve in performance.

American Journal of Occupational Therapy, Atypical Sensory Modulation and Psychological Distress in the General Population
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, Atypical Sensory Modulation and Psychological Distress in the General Population, Study of 204 adults in the community.

ENVIRONMENT

The person-environment approach to employee satisfaction and performance is often discussed in work literature. Blaming the environment is surrendering to performance defeat. Awareness of how to matchmake the person-environment fit will demonstrate an immediate effect on the culture and production. 

This case study presented an employee working in a busy call center who struggled with negative environmental effects on performance. Once the employee understood their unique sensory needs they were able to identify then advocate for person-environment workplace fit. Leaders (the employer) agreed to the alternatives.

The design of the space and amount of people weren’t changed. A telecommute space, type of clothing, and use of technology did change. The employer “now considers (them) as a high performer”, social interactions with colleagues were “notably improved” and the employee reported feeling “valued by (the) supervisor.”